ls-ls-nltr.jpg THE OLD WAR HORSE
THE VOICE OF GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247, SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS
VOLUME 21, ISSUE 1,           January 2019
longstreetscv.org
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A quick jump to the articles in this issue:
Commander's Comments, Adjutant's Report, January Program (next), November Program,
December Program (last), Camp Officers, Longstreet's First Corps, Coming Events Links,

Andy COMMANDER'S COMMENTS

On Saturday, January 19th, 2019,1:30 pm, the 212th  anniversary  of  his
birth,  the  Lee-Jackson  Camp #1, SCV will hold a commemorative service
for Gen Lee at the Confederate War Memorial Chapel, 2900  Grove  Ave  at
Boulevard  in  Richmond,  VA.   David  Born  will  portray  Col  Charles
Marshall, Aide-de-camp and Military Secretary to the general during  the
war.  During this period he came to know the General as well as any man.
He will share his insights with us.  Col  Marshall  also  spoke  at  the
dedication  of  Gen  Lee's statue on Monument in 1890.  The service will
also feature comments from the VA UDC, period music accompanied  on  the
newly  restored  organ  and  a  special message from President Dwight D.
Eisenhower.                                                             

Several  restoration  projects  have  recently  been  completed  in  the
sanctuary  and  on  the  grounds  and  plans are being developed for the
stained-glass windows.                                                  
							Andy   

Art ADJUTANT'S REPORT

The December meeting was held on December  4th,  2018  at  the  Westwood
Club.  Our Speaker was Alyson Taylor-White.  Her topic was "Mayor Mayo's
Surrender of the City of Richmond."                                     

The January meeting will be held on Tuesday, 1/15/19 in the NEW ROOM  at
our usual location, Roma's Restaurant. (The new room is to the right all
the way to the back.)                                                   

To date, 59 members have renewed their membership with our camp.        

Our Camp is in good financial condition however please consider donating
to the Buck Hurtt Scholarship Fund.                                     

It is with great sadness that we recently lost a long time member.  Rufus
Sarvay, IV  passed away on Christmas Day from a recent illness.  He was a
special friend of mine and will be greatly missed.                       
							Art   

Cedar Mountain & Payne's Farm Battlefields Tour

Will be re-scheduled in the spring.
						Paul

GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247

NEXT MEETING - Tuesday, January 15, 2019

ROMA'S RESTAURANT
8330 STAPLES MILL RD.
LOCATED IN "THE SHOPS AT STAPLES MILL"
TURN LEFT AT FIRST STOPLIGHT NORTH OF
THE WISTAR SHOPPING CENTER

DINNER - SOCIAL 6:00 PM
MEETING STARTS AT 7:00 PM


OUR JANUARY SPEAKER


"A Soldier's Life"
by
Randolph Hall Watkins

Randy Watkins has a career in Public Service.  He is a 12  year  veteran
of  the  US  Navy  and  Naval  Reserve  as  well  as  being a 20 US Army
reservist.  Prior to working  for  the  National  Park  Service  he  was
employed by the UVA Police Department and the Chesterfield County Police
Department.  With the National Park Service since 1996, he serves as  an
Interpretive Park Ranger and the Historic Weapons Supervisor.           

He  received  a Bachelor of Arts degree in History and Political Science
from VCU in 1971.  Randy was born in Richmond and lived  on  a  farm  in
western Hanover County.  His wife, Elizabeth, is from Big Lick, Virginia
and they have 2 children, 2 step-children and 2 step-grandchildren.     

Randy currently lives in Dinwiddie County at Sysonby,  circa  1763-1780.
The  property  was  once owned by Fletcher Archer, who commanded the 3rd
Battalion Va.  Reserves at the Battle of Old Men and Young Boys on  June
9,  1864.   Randy's  own  ancestor  in the Army of Northern Virginia was
Robert Henry Watkins,  sergeant,  Company  G,  46th  Virginia  Infantry,
Wise's Brigade.                                                         

OUR NOVEMBER PROGRAM

"The Controversial John S. Mosby, Esq."
by 
Chuck Young

Chuck focused on the postwar career of John S.  Mosby in speaking at our
November  meeting.   Mosby  was  not  included  in the parole of Army of
Northern Virginia soldiers in 1865.  Robert E.  Lee intervened  with  U.
S.  Grant, who likely secured Mosby's parole.                           

Mosby was constantly harassed by Yankee troops on court days in northern
Virginia.  His wife Pauline visited President  Andrew  Johnson  and  was
rebuffed.  She then called on Grant with better results.                

Mosby's  feud  with Generals Jubal Early and Tom Rosser became public in
1867.                                                                   

Mosby entered politics in 1869, supporting the  Conservative  (Democrat)
candidate for Virginia Governor.                                        

Former  General  George  Pickett  and  Mosby met with Lee in Richmond in
1870.  Pickett later remarked' That old man had my division massacred at
Gettysburg."  Mosby said, "Well, it made you immortal." Lee, like Mosby,
was looking forward, while Pickett,  like  too  many  Confederates,  was
looking backward.                                                       

Mosby  would  not  attend  Confederate  reunions,  saying that they were
political.                                                              

He feuded with many former Confederates.                                

In 1875 Mosby closed his Warrenton office and moved to  Washington,  DC.
He supported Republican Rutherford B.  Hayes for president.             

In  1890  he  refused  to  attend  the dedication of the Lee Monument in
Richmond, because Jubal Early would make insulting allusions to "men who
have deserted since the war."                                           

Mosby  battled  the  "fashionable  cult" of Lee and its leaders.  He was
critical of General  James  Longstreet's  memoirs.   He  embarked  on  a
crusade  to clear Stuart of blame for the defeat at Gettysburg.  Several
prominent Confederates claimed that Stuart  disobeyed  orders.   Mosby's
research discovered that Stuart had discretionary orders from Lee, which
Longstreet had approved.  Mosby attempted to see Lee's order  book,  but
was  kept  from  doing so by Colonel Charles Marshall, military aide and
secretary  to  Lee.   Mosby  finally  got  access  several  years  after
Marshall's death.                                                       

Mosby  did  attend a reunion of the 43rd Battalion in 1895.  He said, "I
prefer healing the wounds of the war.  I do not enjoy making them  bleed
afresh.                                                                 

In  1909  a  University  of Virginia football player died during a game.
Mosby said that football should be no part  of  the  curriculum  of  the
university.                                                             

Mosby died in 1916.                                                     
							Walter   

November Attendance: 22

OUR DECEMBER DINNER PROGRAM


"Mayor Mayo's Surrender of the City of Richmond"
by 
Alyson Taylor-White

Alyson, author of "Shockoe Hill Cemetery: A Richmond Landmark  History,"
told  us  at  our  December  Christmas  banquet  that  the population of
Richmond quadrupled after it became the Capital of the Confederacy.     

The connection of the Mayo family to  Richmond  went  back  many  years.
Mayor  of  Richmond  Joseph  Mayo,  born  November  1795,  was the great
grandson of the original Joseph Mayo, who,  with  his  brother  William,
worked with William Byrd in founding the town of Richmond.              

The  younger Joseph Mayo had clients all over the country.  He served as
Richmond's mayor from 1852 through the  end  of  the  War  for  Southern
Independence.                                                           

John Mayo (1769-1818) built the first bridge across the James River.    

The  City suffered much during The War.  Average citizens were starving.
Mayor Joseph Mayo became known for his authoritarian manner, threatening
to shoot rioters.                                                       

When  the  Confederate  army  and government abandoned Richmond in April
1865, Mayor Mayo was left  with  no  instructions.   He  called  a  city
council  meeting,  where  members  agreed to destroy liquor in the city,
lest drunken residents sack the city.                                   

Departing troops  burned  tobacco  storehouses.   Mayor  Mayo  rode  his
carriage  eastward  out  of the city, hoping to find a Yankee officer to
whom to surrender.  He handed over a  surrender  note  to  Yankee  Major
Atherton Stevens and his 40 men of the 4th Massachusetts Cavalry.  Major
Stevens dictated orders to protect inhabitants  and  property.   Stevens
was  followed  by  General  Godfrey  Weitzel, who telegraphed Ulysses S.
Grant that the city had surrendered.                                    

After Lincoln's assassination, Grant ordered the arrest  of  Mayor  Mayo
and  any  city  councilor  who  had  not  taken  the oath of allegiance.
Union-sympathizing Virginia Governor Francis Pierpont  allowed  Mayo  to
resume his office as mayor.  Mayo was later removed by military governor
John Schofield.                                                         

Some people said that Mayo was out of his mind when he  surrendered  the
city.   In  his  final  years he was placed in an asylum, suffering from
dementia.  He died in 1872.                                             
							Walter   

December Dinner Attendance: 27

CURRENT CAMP OFFICERS LONGSTREET CAMP #1247

Commander: Andy Keller 270-0522 1st. Lt. Cmdr.: Paul Sacra 754-5256 2nd Lt. Cmdr.: Chris Trinite Adjutant/Treasurer: Art Wingo 262-2796 Chaplain:VACANT (call Art to report sickness)262-2796 Judge Advocate: VACANT Quartermaster: Floyd Lane 519-1023 Historian: Gary Cowardin 262-0534 For officer E-mail addresses see our
Contact Us page.

PUBLICATIONS

War Horse Editor & Webmaster: Gary Cowardin cowardin@juno.com 262-0534 Website: longstreetscv.org


horseman

LONGSTREET'S FIRST CORPS

Longstreet Camp Donors to  Virginia  Division  Special  Funds,  Old  War
Horse,  Hurtt  Scholarship  Fund, Longstreet Camp General Fund and Corp.
William  Cowardin/Southern  Valor  Memorial  Fund.   As  you  know,  our
cumulative  listing  starts  in  July of each year and we do not meet in
August.                    July 2018 - January 2019                     

Arthur B. Cowardin      Gary F. Cowardin        Leroy Crenshaw, III     
Howard S. Donald        Michael A. Hendrick     Phillip L. Jones        
Crawley F. Joyner       Peter I C Knowles, III  Roger H. Kirby          
Charles Lippy           Lewis Mills             Joseph A. Moschetti     
Floyd G. Mozingo        Stephen A. Parsons      Joseph S. Price         
Peyton H. Roden, SR     Robert L. Ryan          J Harrison Smith, Sr.   
William B. Setzer       Samuel Chris Trinite    Walter D. Tucker        
Preston Nuttall                                                         

COMING EVENTS LINKS

Visit the American Civil War Museum at Tredegar
and the
White House of the Confederacy
www.acwm.org

Pamplin Historical Park and The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier www.pamplinpark.org and their Special Events Calendar
Virginia Division of the SCV and the Old Dominion Voice

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©2019 James Longstreet Camp, #1247, SCV - Richmond, Virginia