ls-ls-nltr.jpg THE OLD WAR HORSE
THE VOICE OF GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247, SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS
VOLUME 19, ISSUE 7,           July 2017
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A quick jump to the articles in this issue:
Commander's Comments, Adjutant's Report, July Program (next),
June Program (last), Camp Officers, Longstreet's First Corps, Coming Events Links,

Andy COMMANDER'S COMMENTS

As we again reach the month of July, we pause to reflect on our nation's
independence  so  hard  won  236  years  ago.   But we may also pause to
remember the high water mark of our second war  for  independence  which
also  occurred  early in July of 1863.  The battle of Gettysburg was one
of the longest battles of the war and was certainly the most bloody  for
both  sides.   It is also the one that most people quickly associate and
identify with the war.  It was the war in microcosm with  the  South  at
first  victorious  only  to  find  its resources too thinly stretched to
prevail in the end.                                                     

Gettysburg thus is particularly important in  family  history  to  those
families on both sides which had ancestors fighting there.  I decided to
look back at my ancestors to see which were present and where they  were
on  July 3.  I had one direct ancestor and nine collateral ancestors who
served in the Confederate Army, four of which were  at  Gettysburg,  all
serving in George Pickett's division.                                   

The  highest  ranking  ancestor  was Colonel Henry Gantt, commanding the
19th Virginia Infantry.  Under his command  was  Captain  Waller  Massie
Boyd  of  Company  G.   Colonel  Gantt  was severely wounded in the face
before the attack even stepped off.  Captain Boyd survived to make it at
least  as far as the famous stonewall on Cemetery Ridge.  He was said to
be the first to touch the wall but  was  wounded  and  captured  in  the
attack.   He  was  held  at  various POW camps before being exchanged in
March 1864.  Colonel Gantt's replacement was killed.  Next to  them  was
the 18th Virginia Infantry with my only paternal ancestor, Richard Henry
Cobbs.  He had been wounded at Gaines Mill but apparently escaped injury
at Gettysburg.  Finally there was Kinloch Nelson who was a Lieutenant of
Ordinance assigned to General James Kemper's Brigade.  He  also  escaped
any  serious  injury.   His  brother,  Philip  Nelson, who was my direct
ancestor, was at his home in Lovington, Virginia caring for their  dying
father after having hired a substitute the previous year.               

War  sometimes  leaves a strange legacy.  Colonel Gantt survived the war
only to die in 1884 from a loss of blood  due  to  hemorrhaging  of  his
facial  wound  received  at the Battle of Gettysburg.  The next year his
younger brother Price, who seems to have managed to avoid serving in the
war,  possibly  by  being the overseer of their farm, married Lila Goode
Boyd, the youngest sister of Waller Boyd thus cementing  those  families
together.  Their son was my grandfather.                                
							 Andy

Art ADJUTANT'S REPORT

Our June meeting was held on June 20, 2017 at our usual location, Roma's
Restaurant.  In attendance were 17 Members and 3 guests.                

Our  guest  speaker  was a member of our own camp, Preston Nuttall.  His
topic was "Blockade Running During The Civil War".                      

2017 membership renewal is  underway  and  all  dues  must  be  paid  by
September 1, 2017.                                                      

Our Camp is in good financial condition however please consider donating
to the Buck Hurtt Scholarship so we may provide a scholarship  equal  to
those provided in the past.                                             
							Art   

GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247

NEXT MEETING - Tuesday, July 18, 2017

ROMA'S RESTAURANT
8330 STAPLES MILL RD.
LOCATED IN "THE SHOPS AT STAPLES MILL"
TURN LEFT AT FIRST STOPLIGHT NORTH OF
THE WISTAR SHOPPING CENTER

DINNER - SOCIAL 6:00 PM
MEETING STARTS AT 7:00 PM


OUR JULY SPEAKER

"Confederate Cherokees.....Thomas' Legion"

by
Michael Virts

Michael is currently the 5th Brigade Commander of the Virginia Division.

He  was  born  in Virginia and his father's mother's ancestors were next
door neighbors  to  the  Lee  Family  on  Orancoc  Street  in  Old  Town
Alexandria,  Virginia.   This is the home that Robert E.  Lee grew up in
as a small boy.  Besides being next door neighbors, they  also  attended
the  same church as the Lee's did in Old Town; that being Christ Church.
Mike's Confederate ancestors were all Virginians.  He majored in History
at  Mars  Hill  University  in Madison County, North Carolina.  Mike has
been a  Chaplain  of  the  Frank  Stringfellow  Camp  #822  in  Fairfax,
Virginia,  in  the  4th  Brigade.   He  also  served  as  Commander, Lt.
Commander, Adjutant, and Chaplain of the Major General Fitzhugh Lee Camp
#1805  in  the 5th Brigade.  Mike served as a Virginia Division Chaplain
and is presently serving as the Treasurer and Communications Officer  of
the  Major  General  Fitzhugh  Lee  Camp  #1805.   Michael Virts' native
background is through his father, who was Cherokee.                     

OUR JUNE PROGRAM



Our Camp member Preston Nuttall used as the  source  for  his  talk  his
latest historical novel The Blockade Runner.                            

Goals of blockade running were to maintain the close association between
the Confederacy and Great Britain, to export cotton, and to import  arms
and other manufactured products needed by the Confederacy.              

Hero of the novel was nonfictional Cambridge graduate Thomas E.  Taylor,
who started out as a clerk working for Edward Lawrence  and  Company,  a
British  business located in Liverpool.  He so impressed management that
he was given the opportunity to serve as supercargo on a ship.          

Most of Tom's sea activity consisted of runs between Wilmington  NC  and
Nassau in the Bahamas.                                                  

Taylor's  early  ship, an old steamer named Dispatch, was described as a
20 year collection of rotting planks and rusting nails.                 

Dispatch was replaced by a  new  ship  Banshee.   It  was  fast,  had  a
telescope  mast,  was  gray-  green in color, and displayed no lights at
night.                                                                  

A later ship was Condor,  manned  by  Brits  and  captained  by  Captain
William  Hewett  of  the  Royal  Navy.   Its  most  famous passenger was
Confederate spy Rose Greenhow.  In rough weather off  Fort  Fisher,  the
small  boat in which she was a passenger capsized, and she drowned.  She
was wearing gold in a sack around her neck.  Tom Taylor found her  body,
which was shipped to Wilmington.                                        

Hewett and Greenhow were real historical characters.                    

Rose  had  left  on Condor dispatches addressed to Jefferson Davis.  Tom
Taylor took them to Richmond.  Jefferson Davis was out of town,  so  Tom
gave them to Robert E.  Lee when they had lunch together.               

After  The  War,  Tom returned to Liverpool, a wealthy man.  Officers in
charge of blockade runners could retire after  three  round  trips;  Tom
made 27!                                                                
                                                      Walter

Writer's note: I read the novel in a week after our Camp meeting.  It is
interesting  and  had  a  romantic  attachment which originated when Tom
Taylor was in Nassau.                                                   

April Meeting Attendance: 20

CURRENT CAMP OFFICERS LONGSTREET CAMP #1247

Commander: Andy Keller 270-0522 1st. Lt. Cmdr.: Paul Sacra 754-5256 2nd Lt. Cmdr.: Chris Trinite Adjutant/Treasurer: Art Wingo 262-2796 Chaplain:VACANT (call Art to report sickness)262-2796 Judge Advocate: Waite Rawls 501-8436 Quartermaster: Floyd Lane 519-1023 Historian: Gary Cowardin 262-0534 For officer E-mail addresses see our
Contact Us page.

PUBLICATIONS

War Horse Editor & Webmaster: Gary Cowardin cowardin@juno.com 262-0534 Website: longstreetscv.org


horseman

LONGSTREET'S FIRST CORPS

Longstreet Camp Donors to  Virginia  Division  Special  Funds,  Old  War
Horse,  Hurtt  Scholarship  Fund, Longstreet Camp General Fund and Corp.
William  Cowardin/Southern  Valor  Memorial  Fund.   As  you  know,  our
cumulative  listing  starts  in  July of each year and we do not meet in
August.                  1 July 2016 - July 2017                        

Brian Cowardin         Leroy Crenshaw,III     Jerold Evans      
Michael Hendrick       Phillip Jones          Crawley Joyner,III
Andy Keller            Peter Knowles,II       Floyd Lane        
Lewis Mills            Conway Moncure         Preston Nuttall   
Floyd Mozingo          Stephen Parsons        Jim Pickens       
Joseph Price           Waite Rawls,III        Peyton Roden, Sr. 
James Smith, Sr.       Chris Trinite          Ed Trope,Jr.      
Walter Tucker                                                   

COMING EVENTS LINKS

Visit the American Civil War Museum at Tredegar
and the
White House of the Confederacy
www.acwm.org

Pamplin Historical Park and The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier www.pamplinpark.org and their Special Events Calendar

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©2017 James Longstreet Camp, #1247, SCV - Richmond, Virginia