ls-ls-nltr.jpg THE OLD WAR HORSE
THE VOICE OF GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247, SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS
VOLUME 17, ISSUE 2,           February 2015
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A quick jump to the articles in this issue:
Commander's Comments, Adjutant's Report, Chaplain's Comments, February Program (next),
January(last), Camp Officers, Longstreet's First Corps, 1864 Events (Feb,Mar), Coming Events Links,

Andy COMMANDER'S COMMENTS

Last month I mentioned two national meetings coming to our area  in  the
next  several months.  In addition the SCV State Convention will also be
held in nearby Colonial Heights on the weekend of April 17-19.   One  of
the  highlights  will  be  lunch  followed  by  bus  tours  of Dinwiddie
battlefields on Saturday following the business meeting.   The  cost  of
the  meal and tour are only $30 and are sites you would not likely visit
on your own.  Most if not all  who  attend  will  also  be  eligible  to
receive reimbursement from the Camp for the $35 cost of the registration
which is in addition to the other costs.  If you would  like  to  attend
please let Art Wingo know.                                              

As always we look forward to seeing you at the meeting on Tuesday.      

							     Andy     

Art ADJUTANT'S REPORT

Our January meeting was held on January 20, 2015 at our usual  location,
Roma's Restaurant.  We had 18 Camp Members and 2 Guest in attendance.   

A  member  of our camp, David Bridges provided us with an excellent talk
on his book The Broken Circle.                                          

The Camp is in need of donations to our Buck  Hurtt  Scholarship  funds.
Please consider donating to this worthwhile project.                    

A  Resolution  for Deceased Compatriot for David Pelham George, Sr.  was
obtained and provided to his widow, Marion George.                      

							Art   

Barton Notes from the Chaplain---

"Love is in the air".  I think that was the theme song on  the  TV  show
"Love  Boat".   Hey,  most  of you guys are old enough to remember that!
Love is certainly in the thinking  for  next  weekend.   What  are  your
plans?  We are having a romantic weekend keeping 2 of our grandchildren!
Love is a hallmark of Christianity.  God is properly described, in part,
as being love Himself.  Indeed, "love" became incarnate in Jesus Christ.
And God's love is not seasonal - it is all the time.  It is summed up in
John 3:16.      Check it out!                                           
                                                     Barton

GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247

NEXT MEETING - Tuesday, February 17, 2015

ROMA'S RESTAURANT
8330 STAPLES MILL RD.
LOCATED IN "THE SHOPS AT STAPLES MILL"
TURN LEFT AT FIRST STOPLIGHT NORTH OF
THE WISTAR SHOPPING CENTER

DINNER - SOCIAL 6:00 PM
MEETING STARTS AT 7:00 PM


OUR FEBRUARY SPEAKER


The Fight for Roanoke Island
by
Will Glasco
Will Glasco grew up in Hanover  County,  Virginia,  not  far  from  Cold
Harbor  Battlefield.   At  a  young  age,  he toured battlefields in the
Richmond area with his father and grandfather, which instilled in him  a
love  of  Virginia  history.   He  learned the value of hard work at his
family's business, Transit Lumber, during summers  in  high  school  and
college.   Attending  the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, he
majored in Creative Writing, and soon after graduation  in  2008,  began
working at the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond.  Starting off as a
tour guide in the White House of the Confederacy, Will  worked  his  way
up,  serving  in  many  roles  before  finding a home in the Development
Department.  In early 2014, he took the position as Director  of  Annual
Fund   at  Preservation  Virginia,  a  Richmond  based  non-profit  that
specializes in saving historic sites.                                   

JANUARY PROGRAM



Our own Camp member David Bridges, author of "Fighting with JEB Stuart::
Major James Breathed and the Confederate Horse Artillery" and historical
novel "The Broken Circle," spoke enthusiastically about  the  Major  and
the love of his life Mollie Macgill at our January meeting.             

Breathed attended the College of St.  James in Hagerstown MD, where many
Episcopal priests had trained.  He interned  and  studied  medicine  for
three  years  (1855-1858)  under  his  relative  Dr.  Charles Macgill of
Hagerstown, MD.  This  was  followed  by  study  at  the  University  of
Maryland School of Medicine.                                            

David focused on five aspects of heroism:
				Bravery
				Intelligence
				Spiritual
				Self-sacrificing
				Compassionate humanitarianism	

Mollie Macgill and Breathed qualified as heroes.                        

Breathed, recruited  by  JEB  Stuart,  established  his  bravery  in  70
engagements during The War.  At Trevilian Station he ordered his battery
forward as Yankee counter battery got closer.  Mollie shot and killed  a
Yankee soldier from the window of her home in Hagerstown.               

Breathed displayed his intelligence  as  he  retrained  himself  from  a
doctor  into  an  artillerist  killing  machine.   He  was a self-taught
brilliant tactician.                                                    

Mollie's training at The Hagerstown Female Seminary, a Christian school,
would have encouraged her faith, just as James would have at St.  James.

James,  as all great leaders do, was willing to sacrifice his own safety
for the benefit of the men whom he led.  This inspired devotion in them.

Breathed was conflicted in his two professions of  doctor  and  soldier.
After  The  War  he  would  go  from  his  home  in Hancock MD above the
Mason-Dixon Line to deliver Yankee babies.                              

Mollie Macgill and James Breathed were great role models.               

James died in 1870 from a wound received in The War  and  the  resulting
use of laudanum.                                                        

David's  research  of  his  illustrious ancestor contributed mightily to
Major James Breathed being awarded the Confederate  Medal  of  Honor  in
2013.   The  Medal  is  on display at the Grafitti House near the Brandy
Station battlefield.                                                    
                                                            Walter      
January Meeting Attendance: 20

2012-2014 CAMP OFFICERS LONGSTREET CAMP #1247

Commander: Andy Keller 270-0522 1st. Lt. Cmdr.: Paul Sacra 754-5256 2nd Lt. Cmdr.: Chris Trinite Adjutant/Treasurer: Art Wingo 262-2796 Judge Advocate: Waite Rawls Quartermaster: Floyd Lane 519-1023 Historian: Gary Cowardin 262-0534 Chaplain: Barton Campbell 794-4562 For officer E-mail addresses see our
Contact Us page.

PUBLICATIONS

War Horse Editor & Webmaster: Gary Cowardin cowardin@juno.com 262-0534 Website: longstreetscv.org


horseman

LONGSTREET'S FIRST CORPS

Longstreet Camp Donors to  Virginia  Division  Special  Funds,  Old  War
Horse, Hurtt Scholarship Fund, and Longstreet Camp General Fund.  As you
know, our cumulative listing starts in July of each year and we  do  not
meet in August.          1 August 2014 - 1 February 2015                 

Walter R. Beam        Leroy G Crenshaw         Arthur B. Cowardin
Dale A Harlow         Crawley F. Joyner, III   Phillip Jones     
Andy Keller           Peter I Knowles II       Jack Maxwell      
Lewis Mills                                                      
Conway Moncure        Robert H Moore, Jr.      Floyd G Mozingo   
Preston Nuttall       Jim Pickens              Joseph S Price    
S Waite Rawles        Peyton Roden             James Smith       
Chris Trinite         Walter Tucker            Harold E. Whitmore

February 1865

1 Yankee MGEN William Tecumseh Sherman began his march into South Carolina from Savannah GA and Beaufort SC. 2 Lincoln left Washington for Hampton Roads to meet with the three Confederate commissioners awaiting him there. 3 Lincoln and Secretary of State William H. Seward met with the Confederate commissioners aboard the River Queen in Hampton Roads. Nothing resulted from the meeting because the Confederates demanded terms between independent nations and the Yankees demanded unconditional restoration of the Union. Maryland, New York, and West Virginia ratified the 13th Amendment. 4 Lincoln returned to Washington. 5 Grant's move to extend the Yankee lines south and west of Petersburg led to the battle of Hatcher's Run. 6 John C. Breckenridge became Confederate Secretary of War. Robert E. Lee received orders naming him General-in-Chief of all Confederate Armies. 7 Kansas and Maine approved the 13th Amendment, which failed to receive sufficient votes in Delaware. 8 The Yankee House of Representatives passed a joint resolution declaring that the eleven seceded states were not entitled to representation in the Electoral College. 9 Robert E. Lee proposed and Jefferson Davis approved a pardon to deserters who reported within 30 days. 10 Confederate Navy Captain Raphael Semmes was promoted to Rear Admiral and put in command of the James River Squadron. Missouri and Ohio ratified the 13th Amendment. 12 Lincoln was re-elected President by the Electoral College with 212 votes against 21 for McClellan. 17 Yankees captured Columbia, SC. Charleston, SC was evacuated by Confederates. 18 Yankees under Prussian born BGEN Alexander Schimmelfennig entered Charleston SC which had been evacuated by Confederates. 20 After a long debate the Confederate House of Representatives authorized the use of slaves as soldiers. 22 Yankees entered Wilmington NC, the last major Confederate port, without opposition. GEN Robert E. Lee assigned GEN Joseph E. Johnston to command the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida and the Department of Tennessee and Georgia. 23 Minnesota ratified the 13th Amendment. 27 Yankee LTGEN U. S. Grant ordered MGEN Phil Sheridan to destroy the Virginia Central Railroad and the James River Canal, take Lynchburg, and then either join MGEN William Tecumseh Sherman or return to Winchester.

March 1865

1 Sheridan's cavalry pursued the remnants of LTGEN Jubal Early's Confederates. Wisconsin ratified the 13th Amendment; New Jersey rejected it. 2 Yankee cavalry dispersed Early's army at Waynesboro. 3 38th U. S. Congress held its last session. It established the Freedmen's Bureau. 4 Yankee President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated for his second term. 6 Joseph E. Johnston, in addition to his existing responsibilities, took command of all troops in the Department of North Carolina. 8 Confederate attacks were repulsed in the battle of Kinston, which lasted for several days. The Confederate Senate by a vote of 9 to 8 approved the use of Negroes as soldiers. 11 Yankees occupied Fayetteville NC. 13 Confederate President Jefferson Davis signed the bill approving the use of Negroes as soldiers. 16 Yankees won the battle of Averasborough NC.

COMING EVENTS LINKS

February 21, 2015 9:30am-4pm The American Civil War Museum presents: "Person of the Year 1865 Symposium" at the Library of Virginia This will be our last "Man of the Year" topic, and speakers include Bill Cooper, Will Greene, Bob Kenzer, Cassandra Newby-Alexander, and Elizabeth Brown Pryor. Reservations are required. You can sign up on line through
this link or by E-mailing John Coski at jcoski@acwm.org or Phone: (804)649-1861,Ext.131
Visit Virginia 150 Sesquicentennial Events VA Sesquicentennial Logo www.virginiacivilwar.org/events.php
Visit the The Museum of the Confederacy Online www.moc.org and their Events Calendar for MOC Events Calendar
Pamplin Historical Park and The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier www.pamplinpark.org and their Special Events Calendar

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