ls-ls-nltr.jpg THE OLD WAR HORSE
THE VOICE OF GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247, SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS
VOLUME 7, ISSUE 5,           MAY, 2005
SCV logo

A quick jump to most of the articles in this issue:
Commander's Comments, Adjutant's Report, May Program (next), April Program (last),
Camp Officers, Longstreet's First Corps, New Compatriots, Raffle Winner, SCV News,

A CALL TO ARMS!!! THE LONG ROLL IS SOUNDING!!!

YOUR LONGSTREET COMPATRIOTS NEED YOU TO JOIN THEM AT THE ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE VIRGINIA DIVISION AT THE SHERATON RICHMOND WEST HOTEL 6624 WEST BROAD STREET IN RICHMOND, VA. FRIDAY, MAY 20, 2005-SUNDAY, MAY 22, 2005 HELP US TO MAKE THIS AN UNFORGETTABLE CONVENTION FOR THE MEN OF THE VIRGINIA DIVISION. DO IT NOW BY SENDING IN YOUR REGISTRATION OR BY REGISTERING ON LINE. ADJUTANT WALTER TUCKER WILL HAVE FORMS ON HAND AT THE MAY MEETING. FILL ONE OUT BEFORE YOU LEAVE. LET'S ALL HELP TO HAVE A GOOD TURNOUT AT THE CONVENTION. YOUR OFFICERS HAVE WORKED VERY HARD TO MAKE THIS THE BEST STATE CONVENTION EVER! SHOW THEM YOUR SUPPORT BY ATTENDING!

Harry COMMANDER'S COMMENTS

How very much like our  ancestors  we  Sons  of  Confederate
Veterans really are!!

As  I  peruse  the  veritable cornucopia of legal documents,
court opinions, press releases and policy analyses,  not  to
mention  the  overabundance  of bellicose saber rattling and
vitriolic rhetoric that seems to infest my home computer  on
a  daily  basis all heralding the arrival of some new crisis
within the organization and more often than  not  portraying
men who are supposedly our Compatriots and Brothers-in-Cause
as little more than liars and rogues, I am reminded  of  the
post-War musing of an unidentified Confederate veteran.  "If
we had expended as much time and effort fighting the Yankees
as  we did fighting ourselves, we would have won the War." A
very astute observation and one which is indeed timely given
the current state of affairs within the SCV.  But rancor and
contention have been a part of the Confederate mindset since
the very first murmurs of secession rumbled across the South
like distant peals of thunder.  The collective leadership of
the  Confederate  military,  as  well  as  that of the civil
government of the CSA, spent most of its existence embroiled
in  one  internal  squabble  after  another,  most caused by
arrogance, ego and an inability (or refusal) to  acknowledge
another's  point  of  view.   To  enumerate each instance of
internecine controversy within the CSA would require a  tome
of  Biblical  proportions,  but  one  case  that  serves  to
enlighten us as to the ramifications of internal conflict is
that of Stonewall Jackson and A.  P.  Hill.                 

The  two  first met in 1842 as newly appointed Cadets to the
Academy at West Point.  Reticent,  nearly  impoverished  and
lacking even basic social skills, Thomas Jackson immediately
(although unintentionally) ran afoul of  his  fellow  Cadets
including the aristocratic and socially adept Ambrose Powell
Hill.  "Cadet Jackson is a jackass!" was the consensus among
Jackson's  Virginia  classmates,  and  Hill  and his elitist
associates promptly resolved to have nothing further  to  do
with  the  marginal Cadet Jackson who graduated only "by the
skin of his teeth." But fate often  takes  a  hand  in  such
matters and by 1862 "Jackson the jackass" was A.  P.  Hill's
commanding officer  in  the  Confederate  Army  of  Northern
Virginia.   It  was  only  through  the  urging of no less a
personage  than  Robert  E.   Lee  himself  that  Hill   was
persuaded  to  serve  under  the eccentric and authoritarian
Jackson, now dubbed "Stonewall." Their  mutual  dislike  had
only  intensified  since  leaving  West  Point, and Hill had
publicly stated  that  Jackson  should  be  held  criminally
derelict  for  his tardiness at Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill
and Glendale during the Seven Days  Battles.   Jackson  held
Hill in equally low esteem.                                 

So  it  was  that  September  3,  1862 found A.  P.  Hill at
Stonewall's headquarters being briefed on  the  Army's  next
mission.   General  Lee had ordered an invasion of the North
and Jackson's troops were  to  occupy  Maryland.   Hill  was
ordered  to set his watch by Jackson's own timepiece and was
given meticulous instructions for the next day's  movements.
Timing was critical and Hill's Division was to move quickly,
marching in 50 minute  intervals,  halting  only  for  a  10
minute  rest  period each hour.  As always, Jackson expected
his orders to be obeyed to the letter and it was  with  much
chagrin  early  on  the  morning  of  September  4  that  he
discovered half of the Light Division still in camp  without
any  coordination  of effort and apparently oblivious to the
fact that they were at least half an hour  behind  schedule.
To make matters worse, General Hill was nowhere to be found.
Jackson  immediately  went  in   search   of   his   missing
subordinate  but  soon  found  out that Hill who should have
been accompanying the column, had taken  the  point  in  the
march and was far ahead and out of sight of his troops.  Now
thoroughly annoyed, Jackson  joined  the  lead  elements  of
Hill's  Division  on  the  march and when the appointed time
came for the required rest stop Jackson ordered a halt.  Very
shortly  thereafter, A.  P.  Hill and his staff thundered up
to the  head  of  the  now  stationary  column.   Completely
ignoring  Jackson,  Hill  angrily  demanded of a subordinate
officer the reason for the halt, and with a fair  amount  of
discomfort  the  officer  attempted  to  explain  that Corps
Commander Jackson himself had issued  the  order.   Seething
with rage Hill glared at Jackson, removed his sword from its
scabbard and thrust the hilt toward Stonewall declaring,  "I
submit  my resignation, sir!" Jackson stifled his own anger,
ignored the extended sword  and  answered  curtly,  "General
Hill,  consider  yourself  under  arrest for disobedience of
orders." Hill angrily sheathed his sword  and  rode  quickly
toward the rear.  Stonewall immediately replaced Hill with a
senior brigadier and later stated with obvious satisfaction,
"I  found that under (Hill's) successor, my orders were much
better carried out."                                        

The animosity between two of the  brightest  stars  ever  to
grace  the  firmament  of the Confederate military continued
until Jackson was shot by his own men  at  Chancellorsville.
It  was  then  and only then that A.  P.  Hill and Stonewall
Jackson resolved their personal conflict as  Hill  earnestly
sought  to  ease  the  suffering  of  his  mortally  wounded
commander in the darkness of  the  woods  lining  the  Plank
Road.   Hill  held  Jackson's  head  on  his knee as Jackson
relinquished command of  the  Second  Corps  to  his  former
nemesis.   Hill's  tone  evidenced  his  genuine concern and
compassion for Jackson when he spoke, "I have been trying to
make the men stop firing.  I am very sorry that you are hurt
General.   I  will  try  to  keep  your  accident  from  the
knowledge  of  the  troops."  A  grateful  Stonewall replied
simply, "Thank you." It was the last  communication  between
the two.                                                    

The  nature  of this relationship had, as is to be expected,
caused others to "take sides," with each man attracting  his
respective  supporters  and  detractors.  As fate would have
it, Jackson's fatal wounds were inflicted  by  troops  under
Hill's direct command giving rise to the belief by some that
the incident might not have been "accidental." There was  no
truth to such rumors but truth is not a necessary ingredient
in  the  recipe  to  concoct  ill  feelings,  suspicion  and
contempt.   Did  A.   P.   Hill order the assassination of a
General whom he considered "criminally derelict?"  Did  Hill
wish  command  of  the Second Corps for himself, which would
have been impossible while Jackson was  alive?   Did  Hill's
troops  of  their  own  accord  exact  revenge  upon the man
responsible for the false  accusations  and  humiliation  of
their  beloved  commander?   The  answer  to  all  of  these
questions  is  of  course  no,  but  the  ill  feelings  and
contention  stemming  from the Jackson-Hill controversy were
like ripples from a stone thrown into a quiet pond.         

Such ripples are now spreading throughout the  SCV.   It  is
indeed  unfortunate that we as an organization are expending
precious time and resources fighting among ourselves  rather
than resolving to honor our history and heritage in a manner
befitting the sacred memory of our ancestors  and  one  that
will  not  furnish  our  detractors  with  more  than  ample
weaponry to be used  against  us  in  the  arena  of  public
opinion.   I  often  wonder  these days if this organization
will be able to carry on in service to the Cause as  did  A.
P.    Hill,   or   whether   it   will   come   to  its  own
Chancellorsville, following Stonewall Jackson to "cross over
the river and rest under the shade of the trees."           

					Harry

Harry ADJUTANT'S REPORT

Please mark you calendars for four key dates:               

Saturday May 14 10:00 AM.  Grave marker  ceremony  at  Shady
Grove United Methodist Church, 4825 Pouncey Tract Road, Glen
Allen, honoring Sergeant Pembroke Somerset Leake of Taylor's
Battery.  The church is a white frame building approximately
1.3 miles north of  West  Broad  Street  Road,  just  beyond
Strikers Park.                                              

Tuesday  May  17  6:00 PM.  Camp meeting.  Please bring your
Ukrop's Golden  Gift  Certificates  to  this  meeting.   The
deadline  for  turning them in to Ukrop's by our Camp is ten
days before our June meeting.  We have  been  able  to  make
donations  to several battlefield preservation organizations
with the money raised by your generous contributions. Please
mail  your  certificates  to  me if you don't plan to attend
this meeting.                                               

Friday May  20  through  Sunday  May  22  Virginia  Division
Convention  at  the  Sheraton Richmond West, 6624 West Broad
Street, hosted by our Camp.  There's still time to register.
Please do so and support our Camp.                          

Saturday  June  4  10:00 AM Jefferson Davis Memorial Service
Hollywood Cemetery.  Our Camp Commander Harry Boyd  will  be
the keynote speaker.  Let's turn out and support him.       

Sincere thanks to Lewis Mills, Gene Golden, Pat Hoggard, and
Peyton Roden for cleaning up the Longstreet camp's one  mile
stretch  of  Studley  Road (Route 606), Hanover County, near
Enon Church on Saturday, April 16.  Lewis is team leader for
this  project.   Peyton  deserves  extra thanks for bring an
extra stick with a nail in the end which helped the back  of
the  stick wielder.  We are always pleased to have guests at
our meetings.  Matthew Ferguson's  induction  at  the  April
meeting  encouraged his mother, grandmother, an aunt, and an
uncle to attend.  Our  Camp  member  David  Ware,  Matthew's
uncle, was also in attendance.                              

It was great to have Ken Parsons back with us after surgery.

If  you're  ever  at Exit 98 on I-95, Santee, SC, be sure to
stop at Maurice's  Barbecue.   Proudly  flying  outside  are
flags  representing  13 Confederate states, in addition to a
Confederate flag.  These do not deter anyone  in  search  of
good barbecue.  There's a great quote from John Shelton Reed
in the May 4 Richmond Times-Dispatch, "Southern barbecue  is
the  closest thing we have in the U.S.  to Europe's wine and
cheeses.  Drive a hundred miles and the barbecue changes."  

The walls inside Maurice's contain prints  of  The  War.   A
drawing  of Wade Hampton includes this quote from that great
Confederate cavalry  general,  "If  we  were  wrong  in  our
contest,  then the Declaration of Independence of 1776 was a
grave mistake and the revolution which led to it was a great
crime.   If Washington was a patriot, Lee cannot have been a
rebel."                                                     

The Military Order of the Stars and  Bars  recently  awarded
its prize for the outstanding War Between The States book to
Edward G.  Longacre for his biography  of  Hampton  entitled
Gentleman  and Soldier: A Biography of Wade Hampton.  In his
remarks  at  the  ceremony  held  at  the  Museum   of   the
Confederacy  Mr.   Longacre  stated that Hampton represented
the ideal citizen  soldier.   Our  Camp  member  and  Museum
Executive  Director Waite Rawls took the attendees on a tour
of the Museum's current feature exhibit on  the  Confederate
Navy.  The exhibit is outstanding.                          


				Walter Tucker


GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247
NEXT MEETING-TUESDAY, MAY 17, 2005

(The New) ROMA'S RESTAURANT 
8330 STAPLES MILL RD.
LOCATED IN "THE SHOPS AT STAPLES MILL"
TURN LEFT AT FIRST STOPLIGHT NORTH OF
THE WISTAR SHOPPING CENTER

DINNER- SOCIAL 6:00 PM



MAY PROGRAM

The speaker for May will be Mr.  Carl Wood.  He is  an  avid
artillery  collector  and  student  of  Civil  War Artillery
Technology.  He will be giving a  "show  and  tell"  on  the
artillery  shells  and  technology  used  during  the War of
Northern Aggression.                                        

This is a subject that,  to  our  knowledge,  has  not  been
presented  to  us  before.   It should be a very interesting
program.                                                    

Be sure to attend and bring along a prospective member or  a
friend.                                                     

APRIL PROGRAM

Dr.  Louis Manarin, retired Chief Archivist of  the  Library
of  Virginia  spoke  about  his book Henrico County Field of
Honor at our April 19 meeting.                              

The idea for the book originated in Henrico  County  Manager
Virgil Hazelett's interviewing Dr.  Manarin about a study of
two War Between the States  battlefields,  Savage's  Station
and  New  Market  Heights.   This resulted in Dr.  Manarin's
submitting a 90 page report.  County Manager Hazelett  asked
him  to  expand  it.  Thanks to this, we now have a 970 page
work in two volumes which gives  us  much  more  information
than we've had before.                                      

Dr.  Manarin was delighted to return to his love of research
and writing,  after  managing  40  some  archivists  at  the
Library.   He  reminded  us of technological advances in The
War,  such  as  ground  torpedoes  (land  mines),   railroad
artillery,  and  an  observation  balloon.   The  latter was
included in the McIlwain sketches.                          

Volume 1 of his book, which goes through Malvern Hill  (July
1,  1862),  has  several  human  interest stories of Henrico
citizens during The Seven Days Campaign.  George Savage sent
his  family  away  from  their  home during McClellan's 1862
campaign to take Richmond.  Mr.  Savage wanted  to  stay  at
the  home  to  protect  it  from Yankee depredations.  Major
General Samuel Heintzelman  took  it  as  his  headquarters,
requiring Savage to take an oath of allegiance to the United
States.  Mr.  Savage later said that  he  took  it  "without
kissing  the  Book." When the Yankees left, the Confederates
heard about this  and  required  him  to  take  an  oath  of
allegiance to the Confederate States of America.            

The  Reverend  Oscar Littleton was a pastor in the Methodist
Episcopal Church South  at  Willis  Church.   He  had  three
family members serving as Confederate Army officers.  Because
of this, he refused to say that he would not aid Confederate
Army  officers.  The Yankee Provost Marshal had him arrested
and sent as a prisoner to Fort Monroe.                      

Volume 2 opens with  a  chapter  entitled  "War  Returns  to
Henrico."  The  County  was relatively quiet after the Seven
Days until Grant's Overland Campaign brought  him  south  in
1864.   Much  previous  writing  focused on Petersburg after
Cold Harbor.  Dr.  Manarin was able to take advantage  of  a
wealth of material that has turned up in recent years and of
modern technology which has enabled students of The  War  to
determine  better  what  happened  where.  He combined these
with use of the Jed Hotchkiss 1864 map  in  the  Library  of
Congress,  a  map  of  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes, and the fine
collection of maps at the University of  North  Carolina  to
give us a better view.                                      

In  his  book  Dr.   Manarin reminds us of the importance of
Henrico  in  Grant's   1864-1865   campaigns   by   devoting
significant  space  to  Second  Deep Bottom, Fussell's Mill,
Fort Harrison, and New Market Heights.                      

There are excellent maps and drawings.  The latter represent
the  conversion  of rough sketches into finished drawings by
an English artist contracted with by Dr. Manarin.           

Dr.   Manarin  has   performed   a   valuable   service   in
highlighting  Henrico  County's  role in The War in his fine
two volume study.   There  are  ample  copies  available  at
branches  of  the Henrico County Library.  Each branch has a
circulating copy and a reference copy.                      

                         Walter

YET ANOTHER NEW COMPATRIOT!



In the top picture, Matthew Warren Ferguson is  being  sworn
in by Lt.  Commander Taylor Cowardin.                       

In  the bottom picture, Matthew receives his certificate and
pin from Adjutant/Treasurer Walter Tucker.                  

It's great to have Matthew aboard!   Be  sure  to  introduce
yourself  to him at the next meeting if you have not already
done so.  Let's let him know that we are as  happy  to  have
him as he is to be with us.                                 

2003-2004 CAMP OFFICERS LONGSTREET CAMP #1247

Commander: Harry Boyd 741-2060 1st. Lt. Cmdr.: Taylor Cowardin 356-9625 2nd Lt. Cmdr.: Michael Kidd 270-9651 Adjutant/Treasurer: Walter Tucker 360-7247 Quartermaster: R. Preston Nuttall 276-8977 Chaplain: Henry V. Langford 340-8948

PUBLICATIONS

Webmaster: Gary F. Cowardin 262-0534 Website: longstreetscv.org War Horse: David P. George 353-8392


horseman

LONGSTREET'S FIRST CORPS

The following is a cumulative listing of contributors to the
upkeep  of  “The  Old  War  Horse” for the period July, 2004
through  the  current  month. As you  know,  our  cumulative
listing starts in July of each year.                        

Ben Baird
Lloyd Brooks
Phil Cheatham
John Coski §
Brian Cowardin*
Clint Cowardin
Gary Cowardin*
Ron Cowardin*
Taylor Cowardin
Raymond Crews*
Lee Crenshaw
John Deacon*
Jerold Evans
Pat Hoggard*
Charles Howard 
Chris Jewett
Jack Kane*
Michael Kidd
Ann Lauterbach+
Frank Marks
Lewis Mills*
Conway Moncure
Kitty Moreau §
Jerry Morris
Joe Moschetti
Richard Mountcastle*
Preston Nuttall
Martha Petro §
Ken Parsons
Norman Plunkett §*
Joseph Seay
Bill Setzer
Will Shumadine
Austin Thomas
Walter Tucker*
John Vial
David Ware
Hugh Williams
Bobby Williams

Legend:                                  
* - Multiple contributions                 
§ - Visitor Donation                       
+ - in memory of Past Cmdr. Tom Lauterbach 

TWO NEW WINNERS!!

THE LUCK OF THE DRAW!! The winner of our monthly drawing was Richard Faglie shown here with his guest , Kitty Moreau. They both seem delighted at the drawing's result, but then most everyone at our meetings smiles a lot. Why not? We have a wonderful group of compatriots and guests and they enjoy the fellowship found at our monthly meetings!

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