ls-ls-nltr.jpg THE OLD WAR HORSE
THE VOICE OF GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247, SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS
VOLUME 6, ISSUE 9, OCTOBER, 2004
SCV logo

A quick jump to most of the articles in this issue:
Commander's Comments, Adjutant's Report, October Program (next), Longstreet's First Corps, September Program (last),
Camp Officers, New Member, Our New Meeting Place, Web Site, Roberson Reflects, Unit of the Month, Support Our Troops,

Harry COMMANDER'S COMMENTS
The United States Military Academy at West Point,  New  York
was  established  in  1802  and  has  an  enduring legacy of
producing some of the finest military officers in the world,
but perhaps West Point graduates have played no greater role
in the shaping of a conflict than during the War Between The
States.   The  military machines of both the Confederacy and
the Union relied extensively on the  expertise  and  martial
acumen  of  West  Pointers,  who felt the pangs of sectional
loyalty to a greater degree than any others affected by  the
War.   Military  service  builds an almost mystic bond among
those who answer the bugle's call, no matter what the  color
of  the  bugler's  uniform.   Robert E.  Lee called his West
Point peers a "Band of Brothers" and in many cases that bond
overshadowed the hostility and rigors of the most deadly war
ever fought on American  soil.   The  War  pitted  not  only
biological  brother  against  brother,  but  also West Point
brother against West Point brother.  Three hundred  and  six
West   Point  graduates  pledged  their  allegiance  to  the
Confederate States of America and before  the  cessation  of
hostilities,  over 25% of them had given their lives for the
Southern Cause.                                             

The following facts are not only interesting but give  ample
evidence  to  the  supposition  that  some  things  such  as
loyalty, honor and friendship are  capable  of  transcending
even the horrors of war:                                    

Appointment  to  West  Point  was not always an easy matter.
When young George Pickett (later Confederate General) sought
Congressional  appointment  to  the  Academy from his native
Virginia, he was informed that the state's  quota  had  been
filled.   Undaunted,  Pickett moved to Illinois where he was
appointed by then Congressman Abraham Lincoln.              

In an effort to entice Southern  Cadets  to  stay  with  the
Union, West Point staged a huge celebration in observance of
Washington's Birthday, 1860.   Washington's  advocacy  of  a
strong  Federal  government  was  read  aloud  to the massed
Cadets and as they were marching back to the  barracks,  the
band struck up "The Star Spangled Banner." Cadet Tom Rosser,
future Confederate Cavalry Commander, began leading Southern
Cadets  in  repeated  and spirited choruses of "Dixie." This
incident is considered the final split of loyalties at  West
Point.                                                      

Cadet  U.  S.  Grant (later Union General) was once arrested
and confined to quarters for one month for failing to attend
church services.                                            

Cadet  Jefferson  Davis (later Confederate States President)
was once apprehended and court-martialed for drinking  at  a
local  tavern  that was off limits to Cadets.  Undeterred by
his arrest and  sanction,  Davis  was  nearly  killed  while
returning  to campus from the same tavern when he missed his
footing and fell down an embankment, breaking several bones.
He was drunk at the time.                                   

Cadet  George  McClellan (later Union General) graduated 2nd
in the Class of  1846.   He  would  later  be  described  as
possessive  of an "intellect that learns, but of a character
that does not deliver."                                     

Cadet Robert E.  Lee (later Confederate General) was  called
"The  Marble  Model"  by his West Point contemporaries.  Lee
never received a single demerit.   He  later  commanded  the
Academy at West Point.                                      

Just  prior  to the outbreak of open hostilities, a Southern
Cadet  inquired  of  then  West  Point  Commandant,   P.G.T.
Beauregard  (later  Confederate General) if the Cadet should
resign immediately or wait until  his  home  state  seceded.
Beauregard  answered,  "Watch  me  and jump when I jump.  No
need to jump too  soon."  Word  of  Beauregard's  sentiments
reached   Washington  where  an  angered  Secretary  of  War
promptly removed Beauregard from command.  It  was  time  to
jump.                                                       

Three  hundred  and  six Cadets and graduates chose to serve
with the Confederacy and the impact  on  the  United  States
military  was enormous.  The government in Washington became
very suspicious of all West  Pointers  and  relegated  loyal
Cadets  and  graduates  to minor commands, menial duties and
the training of volunteer troops.   Conversely,  Confederate
President  Jefferson  Davis, himself a graduate, immediately
appointed West  Pointers  to  positions  of  high  rank  and
authority.  This is one reason why the Confederacy held such
a tremendous military advantage in the first  years  of  the
war.                                                        

Fort  Sumter,  South  Carolina,  was commanded by West Point
graduate and Academy Instructor Union Major Robert Anderson.
Opposing  him was Confederate General and his former Academy
student P.G.T.  Beauregard.  Throughout the negotiations for
the  surrender  of  the  fort,  the two remained friends and
exchanged pleasantries.  Beauregard expressed "much anguish"
at  ordering  his  troops  to  fire  on  Fort Sumter and his
friend.  A  mere  four  days  before  the  battle  of  First
Manassas,  West Pointer William T.  Sherman began studying a
manual on how to maneuver troops under fire.  He stated,  "I
never thought about it before."                             

Union  Commander  Irvin  McDowell  and Confederate Commander
P.G.T.  Beauregard, former classmates at  West  Point  found
themselves  opposing  each  other  at  Manassas.   Both were
devotees  of  Napoleon.   With  typical  Napoleonic   flair,
Beauregard wrote very complicated and verbose orders that no
one could understand, even his own commanders.  In one case,
a   Confederate   brigade  was  ordered  to  attack  another
Confederate brigade.  McDowell likewise concocted a strategy
so grandiose in scope that one analyst opined "it would have
taken Napoleon himself and his Grand Army to carry it out." 

Stonewall Jackson was once described  as  "the  most  poorly
prepared  Cadet  in  West  Point  history."  But  his Valley
Campaign is considered  a  model  of  West  Point  training.
Launched  to  prevent  fellow graduate George McClellan from
receiving reinforcements on the Virginia Peninsula,  it  has
been  described as an "absolute masterpiece" of strategy and
tactics.   Jackson  defeated   four   Union   armies   which
outnumbered him four to one.                                

Union General Ambrose Burnside had been much beloved at West
Point.   His  catastrophic   defeat   at   the   battle   of
Fredericksburg  was  actually  mourned  by  many  of his now
Confederate  classmates,  some  even  offering  the  hapless
Burnside their condolences on his loss.                     

When  Confederate Fort Donelson fell to Union troops, one of
the first things the victorious Commander Ulysses S.   Grant
did  was  to  offer  former  West  Point classmate, defeated
Confederate  General  Simon  Buckner,  his  wallet  in  case
Buckner was in need of funds.                               

At  Gettysburg,  the  dying  Confederate  General Armistead,
leader of  Pickett's  Charge,  requested  that  all  of  his
personal  effects be taken to his best friend and West Point
classmate Union General  Winfield  Scott  Hancock.   Hancock
commanded the troops responsible for Armistead's death.     

During the Siege of Petersburg, Union Commander U.  S.  Grant
defied military regulations  by  ordering  the  lighting  of
bonfires all along the Union lines.  The fires were a salute
to his close friend and  West  Point  classmate  Confederate
General  George  Pickett  on  the  occasion  of the birth of
Pickett's son.  Grant and his staff also  sent  through  the
lines  a  silver  service  inscribed  "To  our friend George
Pickett" as a gift to the proud parents.                    

All relationships among West Pointers during  the  War  were
not  cordial, however.  Confederate General A.  P.  Hill had
once sought the hand of the lovely Ellen Marcy in  marriage;
however,  she  had declined, choosing to become Mrs.  George
McClellan instead.  Hill evidently took the phrase  "All  is
fair  in  love  and war" literally, because he never omitted
any opportunity to  punish  with  the  utmost  severity  the
troops  of his former West Point classmate.  In one instance
after enduring three assaults from troops of Hill's command,
weary  Federals  welcomed  nightfall as the cessation of the
day's attacks, but suddenly Hill  launched  another  furious
onslaught.   As  the  Union troops scrambled to their battle
posts one weary veteran muttered, "Oh my God,  Nellie!   Why
didn't you marry him!"                                      

Union  General  George  Custer  and  Confederate General Tom
Rosser were best of friends at West Point.  On one occasion,
Rosser's  troops  captured  Custer's  baggage train.  Rosser
sent Custer a note requesting that in the future, the  Union
General  should  please  order coats of a larger size as the
ones just captured were too small for Rosser's larger frame.
Turnabout  being fair play, Custer captured Rosser's baggage
later in the War and likewise sent a note asking that Rosser
instruct  his  tailor to alter the coats in his wardrobe, as
they were too large for a "comfortable fit."                

Union General George Custer once crossed enemy lines to  act
as  "best  man"  at  the wedding of a Confederate West Point
classmate, and when Confederate General Stephen Ramseur  was
mortally wounded at the Battle of Cedar Creek, Custer sat at
the fellow graduate's bedside until Ramseur's death.        

The surrender at Appomattox has been  called  a  reunion  of
West Point alumni.  After the surrender ceremonies, at which
nearly all of the participants and spectators in the  McLean
House  were  West  Pointers,  several  Confederate  officers
called upon their classmate Union General George Meade.   As
they  remarked  on how "gray" he had become since their last
meeting, Meade replied, "You have  to  answer  for  most  of
that!"                                                      

West  Point  graduates  Confederate General James Longstreet
and Union Commander U.  S.  Grant renewed their acquaintance
after  the surrender, at which time Grant slapped Longstreet
on the back and exclaimed, "Pete!  Let's go back to the good
old times and have a game of brag as we used to!"           

It's  clear  that  the  West  Point Cadets and graduates who
fought in the War Between The States were indeed "A Band  Of
Brothers"  as  Robert  E.  Lee had so eloquently phrased it.
Enemies on the battlefield but friends nonetheless,  we  can
all take a lesson from so brave and honorable a group of men
who truly took to the heart the Biblical admonition to "Love
thy enemy."                                                 

DEO VINDICE.

					Harry


AN ELECTION FACT

In 1860, Lincoln received less than 40% of the vote!!!
Harry ADJUTANT'S REPORT
We extend our sympathy to Gene Golden, whose  mother  passed
early in the morning of September 22 at the age of 88.  Gene
was with  her  at  the  hospital  prior  to  coming  to  our
September  21 meeting and returned to the hospital after the
meeting.  Gene, our thoughts are with you.                  

Also on September 22 our Chaplain Henry Langford  had  heart
bypass  surgery at Henrico Doctors Hospital.  Commander Boyd
visited him and said he was in great spirits, hoping  to  be
back  with  us soon at the new Roma's.  Henry, we wish you a
complete and speedy recovery.  Henry was the  subject  of  a
column  in  the  September  23 issue of the Virginia Baptist
newspaper The Religious Herald.  The column,  entitled  "The
Happy  Warrior,"  was  written  by  Fred Anderson, Executive
Director of the Virginia Baptist Historical Society.        

Two of our members worked in the Virginia Division booth  at
the  State Fair Sunday, September 26.  This provided a great
opportunity to let many in the public know who  we  are  and
what  we're about.  We received many favorable comments from
fairgoers and got names of prospective members, in  addition
to  selling a few items to raise funds for the Division.  An
SCV member from South Carolina was impressed enough  to  say
that  he's  going  to  recommend that the SC Division have a
booth at the SC fair.                                       

We were pleased to induct  at  our  September  meeting  Fred
Boelt,  whose  great  great  uncle, Edmund Thomas Wynne, Jr.
served as a 2nd lieutenant in Company I, York Rangers,  32nd
Virginia Infantry.  Lieutenant Wynne was killed at Antietam.

The   Camp   voted   to   make  donations  to  the  Richmond
Battlefields  Association  and  to   the   Museum   of   the
Confederacy's  flag  conservation  program  with  the  money
received from Ukrop's for  Golden  Certificates  donated  by
members  of  our  Camp.   Thank you for you contributions to
preserving our Confederate heritage.                        

There has been a significant change in the deadline by which
dues  must  be  sent  to  Headquarters.  In order to avoid a
$5.00 reinstatement fee imposed by HQ, renewal dues must  be
received  by  me  by  Friday, October 29.  Please bring your
check in the amount of $35.00 payable to Longstreet  Camp  #
1247  to our October 19 meeting or mail it to me promptly at
2524 Hawkesbury Court, Richmond, VA 23233.   Thanks  to  all
who have paid dues.  Headquarters and Virginia Division have
been mailed their portions  of  all  who  have  paid  as  of
October  2.   Mailings  will  be  made  to  HQ  and Division
periodically as dues are received.                          

We need to be ever vigilant in defense of our heritage. Upon
reading  about  the feeling of certain Richmond City Library
Board members that Stonewall Jackson's picture should not be
displayed  on  the wall of the Library, I fired off a letter
to  The  Times-Dispatch.   The  letter  suggested  that  the
Library  Board  members  read  Bud  Robertson's biography of
Jackson and then visit the Stonewall Jackson House  and  VMI
in  Lexington.   The newspaper chose not to print my letter.
The obstacles that Jackson overcame to move up each year  in
class standing at West Point and his exploits on Mexican War
and War Between the States battlefields make him one of  the
most  inspiring figures in world history.  The Jackson House
has been renovated recently with funds raised by  a  capital
campaign and is worth a visit.                              

Bring  a  prospective member with you to the October meeting
to hear an interesting speaker and to enjoy  good  food  and
the fellowship of the Longstreet Camp.                      

				Walter Tucker


GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247
NEXT MEETING-TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2004

NEW ROMA'S RESTAURANT 
8330 STAPLES MILL RD.
LOCATED IN "THE SHOPS AT STAPLES MILL"
TURN LEFT AT FIRST STOPLIGHT NORTH OF
THE WISTAR SHOPPING CENTER

PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE!!

DINNER- SOCIAL 6:00 PM



OCTOBER PROGRAM
Our speaker for this month will be  Bill  Potter,  who  will
focus on the Battle of Williamsburg, Virginia.              

Mr.   Potter  is  an author and historian.  He has published
Beloved Bride: The Letters of Stonewall Jackson to His  Wife
and  Boys Guide to G.  A.  Henty.  He is Staff Historian for
The Vision Forum of San Antonio, Texas and is employed by SB
Associates of Virginia Beach.                               


horseman

LONGSTREET'S FIRST CORPS
The following is a cumulative listing of contributors to the
upkeep  of  “The  Old  War  Horse” for the period July, 2004
through  the  current  month. As you  know,  our  cumulative
listing starts in July of each year.                        

Lloyd Brooks
Gary Cowardin*
Taylor Cowardin
Ron Cowardin
Raymond Crews
Chris Jewett
Jack Kane
Michael Kidd
Frank Marks
Joe Moschetti
Richard Mountcastle
Bill Setzer
Austin Thomas
Walter Tucker*
David Ware
Hugh Williams

Legend:                                  
* - Multiple contributions               
§ - Visitor Donation                     

Thanks to all of you for your great support! We're off to
 a running start in the new fiscal year!


SEPTEMBER PROGRAM


TAYLOR COWARDIN, WALTER TUCKER, BOBBY CRICK AND HARRY BOYD
TAYLOR COWARDIN, WALTER TUCKER, BOBBY CRICK AND HARRY BOYD
(L. to R.)

Robert E.  Lee (Bobby) Krick, historian at Richmond National
Battlefield  Park, gave an interesting talk at our September
meeting about General Longstreet's  staff.   Bobby  gathered
this information in research for his recently published book
Staff Officers in Gray: A Biographical Register of the Staff
Officers  in the Army of Northern Virginia.  A staff officer
was defined as a commissioned officer who  did  not  command
troops  in  the  field.   He  could  serve as Quartermaster,
Ordnance,  Engineer,   Signal,   Artillery,   Adjutant   and
Inspector, or Aide de Camp.  A key officer was the Assistant
Adjutant General who "made  the  office  run"  and  was  the
General's right hand man on the battlefield.                

During The War 48 officers served on Longstreet's staff.  The
General served from 1st Manassas through Appomattox,  except
for  a six-month convalescence following his severe wounding
at the Wilderness May 6, 1864.                              

In many respects General Longstreet's staff was  similar  to
others,  the  average age of 29.44 being almost identical to
29.5 for the Army of Northern  Virginia.   There  were  some
differences, one being a smaller number of Virginians.  Three
staff members each attended VMI, the United States  Military
Academy  at  West  Point, and the University of Virginia.  A
significant number did not attend college at  all.   Numbers
from occupational backgrounds were:                         

Merchants	8
Farmers		8
Soldiers	5
Lawyers		4
Clerks		4

Longstreet had only two relatives on his staff;  Stuart  had
nine.   Longstreet sought intelligence in staff members.  He
encouraged promotion of his staff members.                  

Bobby then focused on interesting individual staff  members.
Georgia's  Edward Porter Alexander, Chief of Artillery, gave
us one of the finest first hand accounts of The War  in  his
Fighting  for  the  Confederacy.   Gary W.  Gallagher edited
this book for the University of North Carolina in 1989.     

Another Georgian, G.  Moxley Sorrel, AAG,  authored  At  the
Right  Hand  of  Longstreet:  Recollections of a Confederate
Staff Officer.  Peter Carmichael wrote the  introduction  to
the  Bison  Book edition published in 1999 by the University
of Nebraska.  Sorrel was detailed  to  lead  troops  at  the
Wilderness  which rolled up the left of the Yankee II Corps.
In October  1864  Sorrel  was  promoted  brigadier  general,
commanding  a brigade of Georgia regiments in Billy Mahone's
Division of the 3rd Corps.                                  

nother Longstreet staffer, Texan ADC Major Thomas J.  Goree,
left  us  letters which give insight into Longstreet and his
staff.   The  University  of  Virginia  in  1995   published
Longstreet's  Aide: The Civil War Letters of Major Thomas J.
Goree, edited by Thomas W.  Cutrer.                         

Lesser known staff members had interesting things happen  to
them.   Engineer  Richard  K.   Meade, Jr.  had been a Union
soldier at Fort  Sumter.   ADC  Andrew  Dunn,  a  native  of
Petersburg, was able to sleep at home some nights during the
1864-5 siege.  He was  wounded  in  his  own  home.   Reuben
Blackwell,  another ADC, was the only staff officer of 2,300
who served in the Army of Northern Virginia who deserted.   

Space prohibits mention here of all the Longstreet  staffers
that  Bobby  talked  about  in  his fine presentation, which
measured up to  the  high  standard  he  sets  for  himself.
Bobby's   book   is   available  at  the  Richmond  National
Battlefield  Park's  Tredegar  Visitors  Center   and   from
Amazon.com.   He emphasized that it is a reference book with
some narrative pages at the beginning.                      


                         Walter Dunn Tucker


2003-2004 CAMP OFFICERS
LONGSTREET CAMP #1247

Commander: Harry Boyd                 741-2060
1st. Lt. Cmdr.: Taylor Cowardin       356-9625
2nd Lt. Cmdr.: Michael Kidd	      270-9651
Adjutant/Treasurer: Walter Tucker     360-7247
Quartermaster: R. Preston Nuttall     276-8977
Chaplain: Henry V. Langford           340-8048

PUBLICATIONS

Webmaster: Gary F. Cowardin           262-0534
War Horse:  David P. George           353-8392


ANOTHER NEW COMPATRIOT!!
TAYLOR COWARDIN, WALTER TUCKER, FRED BOELT AND HARRY BOYD
TAYLOR COWARDIN, WALTER TUCKER, FRED BOELT AND HARRY BOYD

We are delighted to welcome Fred Boelt into  our  Camp!   If
you  didn't  get an opportunity to meet him last month, step
up and make yourself known to him at the October Meeting.   

THE WONDERFUL NEWS IS THAT WE NOW HAVE 2 ASSOCIATE MEMBERS, 
1 HONORARY MEMBER AND 71 REGULAR MEMBERS!!!                 


OUR NEW MEETING PLACE!!
The new Roma Restaurant is really great!  The  meeting  room
is  separate from the rest of the dining area and the lights
and background music are controllable by  us  and  the  room
seats 100 patrons, so we have room in which to grow.        

In  addition,  Roma  now  has a cocktail lounge, an enlarged
dining area, an outside patio  and  all  new  furniture  and
equipment.                                                  

We  were  so  pleased  at our first meeting that we gave our
hosts a round of standing  applause  and  thanked  them  for
their efforts.                                              

Wouldn't  it  be  wonderful  if  we could fill the room with
Longstreeters at every meeting?? If you haven't been coming,
please make every effort to do so in  the  future.   You are
missing out on great companionship and first class speakers.

			Dave George



THE LONGSTREET WEB SITE
If you haven't had an opportunity to visit  the  Camp's  web
site  as  yet,  please  take the time to do so.  You will be
pleasantly surprised!  Our webmaster, Gary Cowardin is doing
a  wonderful  job in putting our Camp before the inhabitants
of the Cyber World.  Truly a First Class site!              

Our heartfelt thanks to Gary for his continuing hard work!  

The address is: www.longstreetscv.org



ROBERTSON REFLECTS ON CIVIL WAR CENTENNIAL
Virginia Tech  Distinguished  Alumni  Professor  of  History
James  I.   (Bud) Robertson, Jr.  spoke at the University of
Richmond September 23 in a lecture sponsored by  the  Museum
of the Confederacy, focusing on the Civil War Centennial and
his role therein.  He opined that The War Between the States
will  always be important because today we are a nation born
in 1865.                                                    

In  1957  Congress  created   the   Civil   War   Centennial
Commission,  chaired  by Ulysses S.  Grant, III (then in his
80's) and managed by Executive Director Carl  Betts,  a  man
with  a  public  relations background.  There was a National
Assembly and 34 state commissions.  After the debacle  of  a
re-enactment  of 1st Manassas, which attracted 30,000 people
who were without porta-johns, President Kennedy  purged  the
Centennial Committee, firing 14 of 25 members.              

Highly respected historian Allan Nevins became Chairman. Bud
Robertson,  a  newly-minted  Ph.   D.    teaching   at   the
University   of  Iowa,  was  approached  for  the  Executive
Director's job by Iowa Congressman Fred  Swingle,  by  Bud's
mentor Richard Harwell, and finally by Nevins.  Bud resisted
initially, but finally was persuaded.                       

In addition to the state commissions, there  were  300  city
commissions.   J.   Ambler  Johnston was Richmond Commission
chairman.                                                   

Bud said he felt he was walking on glass during  his  tenure
as  Executive  Director, which began December 26, 1961.  The
South didn't trust the Commission.  Bud said  he  spent  his
first  year  mending  fences  and  the remainder of his term
painting fences.   The  thrust  of  the  Centennial  was  to
commemorate, not to celebrate.  The Commission took no stand
on re-enactments.   President  Kennedy  decreed  that  there
would  be  no  re-enactments on federal government property.
There were no product endorsements.  The  state  commissions
were productive, publishing 230 books and pamphlets.        

Bud  considers himself extremely fortunate to have held this
position.  He got to know four  presidents.   He  knew  two,
Kennedy  and  Truman,  well.   He  worked  four years in the
shadow  of  distinguished  historian   Allan   Nevins.    An
interesting  situation  occurred  because  Bell Wiley, under
whom Bud had studied, came to Washington for his  two  weeks
Army  reserve  duty and was sent by the Army to work for the
Commission.  Bud enjoyed giving assignments  to  his  former
teacher.                                                    

President  John  F.   Kennedy's  last  public  speech was at
Gettysburg November 19, 1963.                               

An amusing  thing  happened  in  February  1964.   President
Johnson  ordered  Bud  on  very  short  notice to invite 100
appropriate  people  to  lunch  at  the   White   House   to
commemorate Lincoln's birthday.  Bud sat at table with seven
actors who had portrayed Lincoln.   The  President,  driving
the  Secret  Service  to  distraction,  ordered a caravan of
limos to take the guests through rush hour  traffic  to  the
Lincoln Memorial to place a wreath.                         

Bud  feels  that the country was more united in 1965 than it
was in 1961.  He feels that The War will never go away.   He
believes  that  the  sesquicentennial  will not have as much
impact  as  the  centennial  did.   Bud   hopes   that   the
sesquicentennial  will  be approached with reverence, but he
fears excess and commercialization.                         

                        Walter Dunn Tucker


OUR THANKS TO MICHAEL KIDD!!
We are deeply indebted to 2nd Lt.   Commander  Michael  Kidd
for the audiovisual equipment and setups that he provides at
each Camp meeting.                                          

Few, if  any,  camps  can  offer  their  members  and  guest
speakers   better  support  of  this  type  than  Longstreet
provides.  Mike  arrives  early  and  stays  late  at  every
meeting to set up and break down his equipment and this adds
another hour or so to his working day, cutting into the time
he should relaxing and enjoying the meeting.                

Mike,  our sincere thanks to you.  We really appreciate your
efforts to make Longstreet the best camp in the Confederacy.


HONORING OUR ANCESTORS
SAMUEL MARTIN LEE

Samuel Martin Lee,  my  great  great  grandfather,  was  the
oldest of four brothers who served in the Confederate army. 

Samuel  joined  Co.   I  (The  Campbell  Guards) of the 42nd
Virginia Infantry on July 11, 1861 at Camp Lee in Lynchburg,
Virginia.   He  was 32 years old at the time and served as a
teamster.                                                   

The 42nd Virginia was a part of General Stonewall  Jackson's
advance  guard  and  was  made  up  of  ten  companies,  A-K
(excluding J) which came from  the  following  counties  and
towns in Virginia:                                          

Henry  Co, (Martinsville), Floyd Co.  ,Bedford Co., Campbell
Co.  (Lynchburg), Patrick  Co.   and  Franklin  Co.   (Rocky
Mount).                                                     

The   battles  in  which  the  42nd  fought  included:  Port
Republic, Kernstown, Mc Dowell, Cold Harbor,  Malvern  Hill,
Cedar  Run,  Winchester,  Cross Keys, 2nd Manassas, Harper's
Ferry,   Sharpsburg,    Fredericksburg,    Chancellorsville,
Gettysburg,   The   Wilderness,  Petersburg,  Ft.   Stedman,
Saylors Creek, Appomatox, Antietam, Payne's  Farm,  Fisher's
Hill Cedar Creek and Spotsylvania.                          

Samuel  was  wounded  during the battle of The Wilderness on
May 5, 1864 and was recuperating until  Febrary,  1865.   He
was discharged at Appomattox Court House in April of 1865.  

			Earl Carwile

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS!

Our Troops

REMEMBER THEM IN YOUR PRAYERS


BE SURE TO  VOTE  IN  THE  PRESIDENTIAL  ELECTION  FOR  YOUR
CANDIDATE!

THIS  ELECTION  WILL  BE ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT IN MODERN
TIMES!

THE POLLS INDICATE A VERY CLOSE RACE, SO  DON'T  THINK  THAT
YOUR VOTE WILL NOT MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

IT WILL!!

Cannon

ALWAYS DEFEND AND PROTECT OUR HERITAGE!

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©2004 James Longstreet Camp, #1247, SCV - Richmond, Virginia