ls-ls-nltr.jpg THE OLD WAR HORSE
THE VOICE OF GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247, SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS
VOLUME 6, ISSUE 8, SEPTEMBER, 2004
SCV logo

Quick jump to some of the many articles:
Commander's Comments, Adjutant's Report, Last Program, WBTS Battles, Next Program, Longstreet's First Corps,
Camp Officers, Memorial to Chuck, Buck Hurtt Award, Raffel Winner, Unit of the Month, WH Editor Award, Calendar of Events,

Harry COMMANDER'S COMMENTS
I once had the good fortune to attend an appearance  by  one
of  America's  most  famous  historians,  Shelby Foote.  Mr.
Foote  was  speaking   at   Mary   Washington   College   in
Fredericksburg  and  I  was  eager  in  anticipation  of his
remarks.  A  portion  of  the  lecture  was  to  include  an
analysis  of  the  Battle  of  Fredericksburg,  a resounding
victory for General Lee and the Army of  Northern  Virginia,
and  as  I awaited the beginning of the program I was struck
with a sense of pride; pride in being a Southerner and  even
more  so  in  being  a Virginian.  This was to be a night to
remember.                                                   

A hush of reverence fell over the hall as Mr.  Foote  slowly
ascended  the  stage  and  eyed  his  audience.  "Ladies and
gentlemen," he began, "I am very pleased to be with you this
evening.   It  is  always  a  pleasure  for  me  to have the
opportunity to visit Virginia." Smiles  of  approval  graced
the  faces of the audience at the gracious salutation.  "But
you know,"  he  continued,  "I  have  found  that  with  the
possible   exception   of  some  folks  living  in  Montana,
Virginians know less about the War than  just  about  anyone
else."  The  smiles  quickly  faded  and an indignant murmur
began circulating among the guests.  I must confess  that  I
too  felt  an indignation at this slight so matter-of-factly
served to me by a man whom I held in so high a  regard.   To
be  sure  my  knowledge of the War was considerable; perhaps
not to the extent of a Shelby Foote, but surely greater than
any  poor  unfortunate  souls relegated to the wastelands of
Montana!  Mr.  Foote paused then smiled, obviously  enjoying
the  reaction  of  his  audience.   But  after  savoring the
discomfiture of us haughty Virginians for a few moments,  he
continued.   "And  that's  because you people think that the
War  was  fought  between  Richmond   and   Washington   and
everything  else  was just a skirmish!" The crowd broke into
riotous laughter and applause, and for the next hour  and  a
half  we  sat  riveted while Shelby Foote held us spellbound
with a masterful presentation of events  taking  place  both
within and without The Old Dominion.                        

As  I  drove  home  I  began thinking about what he had said
concerning the "voluntary ignorance" of we Virginians, and I
had to admit that at least as far as I was concerned, he was
right.  I had to admit that outside of an intimate knowledge
of  the  personalities and campaigns of the Army of Northern
Virginia I possessed only a cursory  knowledge  of  the  War
elsewhere.                                                  

For  a  Virginian  however,  this  is  understandable.   The
Virginia front was by far the most  prestigious  theater  of
the  War.   It  was  in  Virginia  that  Robert E.  Lee, JEB
Stuart, Stonewall Jackson and a host of  other  stars  which
adorned  the  firmament of the Confederate military directed
their brilliant campaigns.  And it was also in Virginia that
the  largest and most celebrated armies of the War, the Army
of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac, fought the
War's  bloodiest and most famous battles.  Yes, it was quite
easy for me to be somewhat smug and elitist in  my  view  of
the  War.   Embarrassed  and chagrined at my own arrogance I
immediately set out to educate myself on these  "skirmishes"
which  had taken place outside Virginia while Robert E.  Lee
was fighting the War Between The States, and my  first  step
was  to purchase an outstanding work by no less an authority
than Shelby Foote himself.                                  

Since  then  I  have  made  the  acquaintance  of  countless
personalities  previously unknown to me, each fascinating in
their own right and each adding to my understanding  of  the
War.   I  have  also learned that the outcome of the War was
not decided solely within the confines of the  Commonwealth,
but  also  in  the  vast  expanse  of  the  Confederacy that
stretched from the Appalachian Mountains to the  Mississippi
and  beyond.   It  was  in the West that many truly decisive
battles  were  fought  in  an  area  characterized  by  vast
distances,  unfavorable  topography,  complicated  political
problems, and "difficult" generals.  My study of the War  in
the West became an eye-opening adventure, and I subsequently
wrote a letter to Shelby Foote  expressing  my  appreciation
for  jarring  me out of an arrogant complacency and offering
me  the  opportunity  to  explore  other  facets   of   that
monumental conflict known as The War Between The States.  To
my  surprise  and  delight   he   wrote   back,   graciously
acknowledging my correspondence and thanking me for choosing
one of his texts to begin my "enlightenment."               

We would all do well to remember that the War was fought  on
many  battlefields,  in  many places and by many people.  As
Virginians we certainly have  "bragging  rights"  concerning
the War and well deserved they are;however, to study the War
efforts in Alabama, Arkansas,  Florida,  Georgia,  Kentucky,
Louisiana,  Mississippi,  Missouri,  North  Carolina,  South
Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas, or anywhere the  Confederate
Flag has been proudly unfurled is to gain a new appreciation
of our  ancestors  and  their  tremendous  sacrifices.   The
challenge  for each of us is to educate ourselves in an area
of the conflict that we may have hitherto neglected in favor
of  a  more exciting or appealing topic.  Each of us has the
responsibility  of  being  modern-day  ambassadors  of   the
Confederacy  in  order  to educate the general public on the
true history of the South and the War  Between  The  States.
The  possibilities for expanding our knowledge of the period
are literally endless and by sailing into  uncharted  waters
you  may  find  as  did  I  that  you  will  gain  a greater
appreciation of your own history and heritage regardless  of
what  Confederate State may lay its claim to you.  God Bless
Virginia and God Save the South!                            

					Harry

Harry ADJUTANT'S REPORT
Wasn't it great to have Patricia, Lia, and Chip  Walton  and
Samantha  Bortell  and  her  parents  with  us  at  the July
meeting?                                                    

The Waltons participated in  the  "official"  attachment  of
Chuck's  bow  tie to the flagstaff of one of our Confederate
flags.                                                      

Samantha was recognized as  recipient  of  the  Camp's  Buck
Hurtt  award  recognizing  the  outstanding  senior  history
student at Douglas S.  Freeman High School.  Samantha begins
her college life at Longwood University in late August.     

Longstreet  Camp  is  starting  the fiscal year on the right
foot by continuing to grow.  We have received the membership
certificate  from  headquarters  of  Frederick  Wills Boelt,
recruited for our Camp  by  Ken  Parsons.   Fred's  ancestor
Edmund  Thomas  Wynne,  Jr.  served the Confederacy as a 2nd
lieutenant in Company I, York Rangers, of the 32nd  Virginia
Infantry.  We plan to have an induction ceremony for Fred at
our September 21 meeting.                                   

Changing his status from associate member to regular  member
is J.  E.  B.  Stuart, VI, who has chosen to make Longstreet
his home camp.                                              

We welcome Fred and J.  E.  B., and we thank Ken Parsons for
his recruiting efforts.                                     

Several  members have already paid their dues in response to
an email request.  If you haven't already paid, please bring
your  $35.00  check payable to Longstreet Camp # 1247 to our
September 21 meeting or mail it to  me  at  2524  Hawkesbury
Court, Richmond, VA 23233.                                  

Delegates  to  the  SCV  national  convention  elected Denne
Sweeney national commander-in chief and Dr.  Anthony  Hodges
lieutenant  commander-in  chief.   Army of Northern Virginia
delegates at the convention elected former Virginia Division
commander  Henry Kidd to the office of commander of the Army
of Northern Virginia.  Randy Burbage is  the  newly  elected
Army of Northern Virginia councilman.                       

Former  Virginia  Division  Commander Sonny Carwile received
the Robert E.  Lee award.  Sonny for several years has  been
chairman of the Jefferson Davis Memorial Committee.  Tireless
Mike Kendrick received the Edward L.  Darling Award  as  the
top  recruiter  in  the  entire SCV.  Congratulations to the
officers elected and to the award recipients.               

Delegates defeated the attempt to dissolve the  relationship
between  the  SCV  and  the  Military Order of the Stars and
Bars.   No  word  has  been  received  yet  regarding  other
amendments.                                                 

While  on  a gift-buying mission at Barnes & Noble the other
day I bought an intriguing book titled The Military  100  by
LCOL  (Ret)  Michael  Lee  Lanning.  His ranking is based on
leaders who were the most influential.   Ordinarily  I  take
such  rankings with a grain of salt, but it is most pleasing
to see George Washington in first place.  Showing that  this
ranking   is   unlike  the  NCAA  tournament,  the  Duke  of
Wellington is  number  22,  while  the  loser  at  Waterloo,
Napoleon,  is  number  2.   Hannibal,  a  household name, is
number  30,  while  the  Roman  who  defeated  him,   Scipio
Africanus, is number 34.  Robert E.  Lee is number 60, while
Grant is 33.  The sub title says "of all time," but  Lanning
starts  with  the  5th  century BC, thus omitting Joshua and
King David.  Most of the names are familiar,  but  how  many
will   recognize   Tilly,   Student,   Conde,   Torstensson,
Mannerheim, Colin Campbell, Konev,  Berthier,  Turenne,  and
Vauban?   Each  subject  is  covered in three to four pages.
This bargain book is well worth the modest price.           

We won't know how much Ukrop's will be sending the Camp  for
Golden Gift certificates until late August.  We shall decide
at our September meeting what to do with these  funds  which
are due to your generosity and Ukrop's' community spirit.   

				Walter Tucker


GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247
NEXT MEETING-TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2004

NEW ROMA'S RESTAURANT 
8330 STAPLES MILL RD.
LOCATED IN "THE SHOPS AT STAPLES MILL"
TURN LEFT AT FIRST STOPLIGHT NORTH OF
THE WISTAR SHOPPING CENTER

PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE!!

DINNER- SOCIAL 6:00 PM

BE SURE TO COME AND BRING A PROSPECTIVE MEMBER OR GUEST!

YOU WILL BE PLEASED TO KNOW THAT THE NEW 
ROOM HAS A CAPACITY OF 100 AND THAT THE 
BACKGROUND MOOD MUSIC CAN BE TURNED OFF!!!!


SEPTEMBER PROGRAM
Our September speaker will be Robert Krick of the 
National Park Service!!

Bob is considered to be one of the top historians of  modern
times  of  the Army of Northern Virginia and his career with
the National  Park  Service  has  spanned  over  thirty-five
years.                                                      

He will speak to us about General James Longstreet's Staff  
officers.  Don't miss this talk!!                           


horseman

LONGSTREET'S FIRST CORPS
The following is a cumulative listing of contributors to the
upkeep  of  “The  Old  War  Horse” for the period July, 2004
through  the  current  month. As you  know,  our  cumulative
listing starts in July of each year.                        

Gary Cowardin
Chris Jewett
Walter Tucker
Hugh Williams

Legend:                                  
* - Multiple contributions               
§ - Visitor Donation                     


2003-2004 CAMP OFFICERS LONGSTREET CAMP #1247 Commander: Harry Boyd 741-2060 1st. Lt. Cmdr.: Taylor Cowardin 356-9625 2nd Lt. Cmdr.: Michael Kidd 270-9651 Adjutant/Treasurer: Walter Tucker 360-7247 Quartermaster: R. Preston Nuttall 276-8977 Chaplain: Henry V. Langford 340-8048


JULY PROGRAM

Virginia B. Morton

Virginia B.  Morton, author of War Between The States  novel
Marching  Through  Culpeper,  gave  a  fascinating talk with
slides at our July 20 meeting.                              

A long time resident of Culpeper,  she  developed  a  deeper
interest  in  The War eight years ago on a tour conducted by
Bud Hall.                                                   

The inspiration for writing a novel about Culpeper came when
she and her daughter took the Midnight in the Garden of Good
and Evil tour during a visit to Savannah.                   

She said that she wanted her novel to be based on fact.  She
also  wanted  to  have  positive,  God-fearing people in her
book.                                                       

Culpeper occupied a strategic location  on  the  Orange  and
Alexandria  Railroad.  Twelve fights took place there during
The War.                                                    

A real life character in her book is  Frank  Stringfellow  a
graduate  of  Alexandria's Episcopal High School, who taught
school in Mississippi just prior to The War.   Stringfellow,
described  as  emaciated,  was  rejected  by the Little Fork
Rangers.  Undeterred, he went to  a  Confederate  encampment
and  captured  Powhatan troops, whom he took to a commanding
officer.  He became a courier for  J.   E.   B.   Stuart  at
Manassas.  He later became a scout and spy for JEB.  He went
three times on missions to Washington,  once  dressed  as  a
woman.                                                      

Another character is Stuart's Horse Artillery commander John
Pelham, called the gallant by Robert  E.   Lee  Stringfellow
and  Pelham  spent  some  time  at Culpeper's Virginia House
Hotel, where they befriended  the  Shackleford  family.   In
March  1863  Pelham was visiting two ladies in Orange before
catching a train to Kelly's  Ford,  where  he  was  mortally
wounded,  dying in the Shackleford house.  Stonewall Jackson
said," With two Pelhams on  my  flanks,  I  could  whip  the
world." Bessie Shackleford was the inspiration for Constance
Armstrong, fictional heroine of the novel.                  

Pelham's successor Robert Franklin  Beckam  commanded  three
pieces   of   Stonewall  Jackson's  artillery  when  Jackson
launched his flank attackr at Chancellorsville.             

Other famous Culpeper natives were A.  P.   Hill  and  Extra
Billy  Smith,  about  whom Virginia told several interesting
stories.                                                    

Infamous Yankees coming to  Culpeper  during  The  War  were
Custer and Judson Kilpatrick.                               

Virginia's  stimulating  talk  about  her  book and Culpeper
encouraged a number of our members to buy her book.         


                         Walter Dunn Tucker



WBTS BATTLES
519 battles were fought in Virginia, 298 in  Tennessee,  214
in  Missouri,  186  in  Mississippi, 167 in Arkansas, 138 in
Kentucky, 118 in Georgia, and 118 in  Louisiana.   One  each
was fought in the District of Columbia, Idaho, Illinois, New
York, Utah and Washington.                                  

THE FLAG AND THE TIE ARE ONE!!
CHARLES EDWARD WALTON, JR.

PAST COMMANDER CHARLES E. ("CHUCK") WALTON
COMPLETE WITH CONFEDERATE TARTAN TIE

Chuck's signature bow tie is now a part of the Camp's Second
National flag and its staff and will honor his memory at all
of the functions attended by us as a Camp.                  

At our July meeting,  Chuck's  widow,  Patricia,  and  their
daughter  Lia,  together with Chuck's son Chip, were present
and joined with us in the ceremony of attaching Chuck's  bow
tie to the flag.                                            

Chuck's Family

THE RECEPIENT OF THE SECOND ANNUAL
LONGSTREET CAMP BUCK HURTT AWARD
JEFF, BETH AND SAMANTHA BORTELL WITH PAT HOGGARD
JEFF, BETH AND SAMANTHA BORTELL WITH PAT HOGGARD

We were delighted to have Samantha and  her  family  as  our
guests at the July meeting.                                 

Not  only  did  Samantha  win  the Hurtt Award for being the
outstanding History student at Douglas Freeman, she was also
a  winner  of the monthly Camp raffle which is the source of
the funds for the Hurtt Award!                              

We wish Samantha well in her studies at Longwood University.
Maybe   we   have   a   budding   historian   of  the  "Late
Unpleasantness" 1861-65 era, who knows?                     

THE OTHER DRAWING!
Kitty Moreau

Another guest won a book in the raffle that night!

Kitty Moreau, guest of Richard Faglie, received  a  copy  of
Tracks  In  The  Sea.   As  you  can  see,  she was somewhat
excited!                                                    

As our Commander is wont to say "A rose among the thorns" is
always  welcome at our Camp meetings.  We are delighted that
she came and invite her to come again.  (Maybe we should ask
her to give a book report next time!)                       

THE VA SCV E-MAIL NETWORK IS BACK!
VA Div.  1st.   Lt.   Commander  Michael  D.   Kendrick  has
announced that the network is back up and running!

If  you wish to join the network, send an email message With
the following information in the body of the message:

VA Div. E-Mail network
Your full name,
Camp Name and Number  
and your current E-mail address.

E-mail this to: mike58-59@mindspring.com.

No  emails  with  attachments   will   be   accepted.    All
information must be in the body of the letter.              

The  Network  is  for the communications on upcoming events,
important information from the Executive Council  and  other
important news pertaining to the VA Division.               

IT  IS  NOT  AN  OPEN  FORUM  FOR  DISCUSSION OR OPINIONS ON
CURRENT EVENTS OR COMMENTS ON INFORMATION THAT HAS BEEN SENT
OUT TO THE MEMBERSHIP.

All  of your emails must be signed with your full name, camp
name and number and your email address.                     

UNIT OF THE MONTH

The 40th Virginia Infantry, and Its
Color Sergeant, George Cornwell
By Preston Nuttall

(Mrs.  Jane George, a friend of ours down in  Northumberland
County,  loaned  me  an  original  letter  pertaining to her
grandfather, George Cornwell, who was color sergeant of  the
40th  Virginia.   Written by his commanding officer, Captain
H.  E.  Coles, upon  the  occasion  of  Sergeant  Cornwell's
death  in  1906,  it  is  a  touching  tribute  to a gallant
soldier, but also speaks volumes about the 40th Virginia and
is  an interesting account written from the common soldier's
perspective.   Except  for  minor   spelling   and   grammar
corrections, the letter is presented here verbatim.)        

"I  have learned with profound sorrow of the death of George
Cornwell, color sergeant of the 40th Va.   Regiment,  better
known as 'Me Lad'.  I was a captain in this regiment and had
the honor to serve as its commander after our  senior  field
officers were killed or captured at Falling Waters.  I never
knew a braver man in the Army of Northern Va.   than  George
Cornwell.   Only  once  did  I know him to fail to place his
battle flag on the enemy's works on first charge,  and  that
was  on the second day at Chancellorsville, which experience
I will now relate.                                          

Our brigade, known at  various  times  as  Field's,  Hill's,
Heath's, Brokenbrough's, Walker's, Major's and Archer's, was
in the advance of A.P.  Hill's  Division,  Jackson's  Corps,
and   struck   the   enemy   about   two   miles   west   of
Chancellorsville on Saturday evening about two hours  before
sundown  on May 1.  We drove them from their camp, capturing
their outfit and a nice  supper  which  was  in  process  of
preparation.   We  poor  devils had had nothing to eat since
the day before, and it was fun to grab the hot camp  kettles
as  we  ran  through  their camp in pursuit.  We fought them
until 9 or 10  o'clock  that  night,  when  General  Jackson
called  a  halt  to await reinforcements.  During the night,
Generals Jackson, Hill, Pender and others were  wounded  and
our  corps  was left entirely without a commander until Gen.
Stuart  arrived  next  morning.   Our  troops  were  greatly
demoralized,  having  lost  our beloved generals, wounded in
the darkness by our own men, many of them.                  

Our brigade, which had fought on the front line the  evening
before,  was  put on the reserve line the next morning, with
our left touching the right of the  old  Stonewall  Brigade,
and  two North Carolina brigades in front of us.  During the
night, the enemy took advantage of our  halt  and  fortified
himself  with three lines of formidable entrenchments.  When
the battle commenced  next  morning,  these  North  Carolina
brigades were ordered forward, one after the other, and they
both stampeded, coming back over us in quick succession.  We
tried  our hardest to rally them, but could not succeed.  We
called out 'for God's sake, what are you running  for?'  and
the answer came back 'because we cannot fly!"               

Soon our brigade, with the 40th Va.  In front, and supported
by the Stonewall Brigade, General Walker in command of  both
brigades,  was  ordered forward and, as Sherman says, it was
like storming hell, such was the terrible  fire.   We  could
not make it on the first charge, but neither did we stampede
as did our Tarheel friends.  By order of Gen'l.  Walker,  we
dropped  on  our  stomachs under a little hill for about ten
minutes.  When the enemy fire had lulled a little,  we  rose
up  and  swept rapidly across the field, and George Cornwell
placed the first battle flag on the ramparts of  the  enemy.
The  gallant  Pegram  and Braxton, with Stuart's cavalry and
horse artillery, came to our support and soon we put them to
inglorious flight.                                          

It  was  here on this field of glory and courage that George
Cornwell received recognition from Gen'l.  Robert  E.   Lee,
an honor that he prized for as long as he lived.  I also was
recognized and recommended for promotion to major, but alas,
owing  to  the  bad condition of the War Dept at the time, I
did not get my commission.                                  

Lest I tire you I must close.  May we emulate the bravery of
'Me  Lad'  and  hope  he is defending the battle flag of his
Maker as nobly  as  he  defended  the  battle  flag  of  the
Confederate States."                                        
                                         Captain H. E. Coles
                                         Lillian, Va.       
                                         January 8, 1906    

WAR HORSE EDITOR RECEIVES AWARD
Dave George

Your Editor was presented with the SCV Commander-
In-Chief Award at the July Meeting.

War Horse Award

I want you to know that this award is really appreciated and
I am highly honored to be the recipient.                    

I  feel,  however,  that  I  am receiving it not for my work
alone  but  also  that  of  the  officers  and  members   of
Longstreet Camp.                                            

The  input from the contributors of articles is unbelievably
excellent and I would say that few newsletter editors  could
claim better writers than those we have here in Longstreet. 

The   support  from  the  Compatriots  of  this  Camp,  both
financial and otherwise, is something  that  I  will  always
treasure.  I cannot begin to tell you how wonderful it makes
me feel to be a part of Longstreet and to be able to make  a
contribution that has been so warmly received by all of you.

We are truly, the best Camp in the nation!

                              Dave George

flags

THEY ARE OURS-RESPECT THEM BOTH!

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
AUGUST 21, 22 National Civil War Arms and  Antique  Show  at
The   Showplace,   Richmond.    Saturday  9-5,  Sunday  9-3.
Sponsored by The North South Trader's Civil War.  For  info:
Stephen W.  Sylvia, (540)672-4845 or show@nstcivilwar.com or
www.nstcivilwar.com                                         

AUGUST  27-29  Image   of   War   Seminar   on   battlefield
photography,  Spotsylvania County.  Speakers: John Hennessy,
Gary Adelman, Ron Coddington, Rob Gibson, William Gladstone,
John   Kelly,   Eric   Mink,  David  Richards,  Bob  Zeller.
Battlefield  tours  of   Fredericksburg,   Chancellorsville,
Wilderness,  Spotsylvania,  Massaponax Church.  Sponsor: The
Center For Civil War Photography and the Spotsylvania County
Tourism    Commission    .     For   info:   Gary   Adelman,
whatsthescene@hotmail.com; www.civilwarphotography.org      

AUGUST 28, 29 7th Annual WBTS Battle of Saltville, VA. Camps
open  at  10:00  a.m.   Demonstrations, battles both days at
2:00 p.m.   Free.   For  info:  (276)496-5342,  Ext.   6  or
www.saltville.com                                           

SEPTEMBER 13, 14 "The Road to Second Manassas," led by Edwin
C.  Berss.  Tour of August,  1862,  with  Jackson  from  the
Rapidan  River  to Manassas Battlefield; from Cedar Mountain
to Brawner Farm.  Hosted by the Friends of Manassas National
Battlefield  Park.  $210 payable to the Friends, P.  O.  Box
2847, Manassas, VA 20108-0894.  For info: (703) 670-3277  or
info@fnmbp, www.fnmbp.org                                   

SEPTEMBER  17-19  "The  Third  Battle  of Winchester and Its
Aftermath: Sept.  19, 1864" in Winchester.  Student  events,
lectures,  battlefield  tours  with  field  hospital, living
history,    exhibits.      For     info:(888)689-4545     or
www.shenandoahatwar.org                                     

SEPTEMBER   18,  19  4HT  Annual  Harvest  Fair  at  Pamplin
Historical Park & The  National  Museum  of  the  Civil  War
Soldier,  Petersburg.   1800  plantation  harvest  fair with
music,  dancing  ,storytelling,  games,   contests,   races,
children's     activities.     For    info:    (877)PAMPLIN;
www.pamplinpark.org                                         

SEPTEMBER  24-26   The   Battle   of   Stanardsville,   near
Stanardsville.    Return  of  the  original  15-year  event.
Battles, fashion show, ladies'  tea,  dinner,  dance,  night
artillery fire.                                             

SEPTEMBER   25,   26   Fort  Harrison  Anniversary  Program,
Satrurday 10-5, Sunday 10-4.  Talks, tours,  living  history
demonstrations.   For  info:  Richmond  National Battlefield
Park, (804)226-1981.                                        

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