ls-ls-nltr.jpg THE OLD WAR HORSE
THE VOICE OF GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247, SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS
VOLUME 6, ISSUE 3, APRIL, 2004
SCV logo

Quick jump to some of the many articles:
Commander's Comments, Adjutant's Report, Last Program, Next Program, Camp Officers,
Units of the Month, Raffle Winners Heritage Parade, Upcoming Events

Harry COMMANDER'S COMMENTS
It is often noted that the War Between the States is  marked
by the similarity of the opposing sides.  Brother was pitted
against brother, family against  family  and  state  against
state.   Both  armies  employed essentially the same weapons
and tactics, and prayed to the same God for guidance.   Even
the  political  ideologies  of  North  and South, their very
justification for war,  were  based  on  a  common  doctrine
handed  down  by  the Founding Fathers.  It is quite obvious
that the similarities between the Confederacy and the  Union
far outnumbered the differences.                            

This  was  clearly  on  the  mind of General Lee when he was
considering his options  at  Appomattox.   Lee  had  several
choices  open  to  him  during those first few days of April
1865, including a tactic that had been used successfully for
thousands  of  years,  namely  guerilla warfare.  If Lee had
agreed to have the Army of Northern  Virginia  disperse  and
continue fighting (as supported by a number of his advisors)
he would have virtually ensured a Southern victory.  So  why
then  did  he  choose to meet with General Grant and discuss
surrender rather than fight on?  For the  same  reason  that
Grant  was  so lenient with the terms and conditions for the
South to lay down its arms.  Neither side viewed  the  other
as  a  "foreign"  enemy.   If the South had been at war with
Prussia for example, Lee would have continued the  fight  to
the  last  man,  but  as  he observed to his staff, "We must
consider the effect which our actions  will  have  upon  the
country  at  large.   If  the men can be quietly and quickly
returned to their homes, there is time  to.begin  to  repair
the  ravages  of  war."  Robert  E.   Lee  had  hit upon the
greatest common element evident between  both  sides  during
the  War.   Whether  supporters of the Confederate States of
America or the United  States  of  America,  they  were  all
Americans.                                                  

But  perhaps  the  post-war  relationship that best typifies
just how alike defenders of the North and South really were,
is  that of John Mosby and U.  S.  Grant.  The pair struck a
friendship when Mosby was introduced to the  then  President
Grant in 1872.  That friendship was to last a lifetime.  The
former "Gray Ghost" was subsequently appointed United States
Consul  at  Hong  Kong  by President Hayes, and it was there
that the two former adversaries last met.  "It was  in  1879
that  I last saw him.  I went in a boat out to meet him.As I
went up the gangway I  recognized  him  with  his  wife  and
eldest son standing on the deck.  It did look strange that I
should be then representing  the  (U.S.)  government,  while
General Grant was (now) a private citizen.  Next morning the
general paid his respects to me at the  American  Consulate.
He  was  the  guest  of  the governor for about 10 days.  On
several days I breakfasted with him, and we  had  many  free
and  informal talks.  I went with the general.in a launch to
the U.  S.  man-of-war which carried his party up the  China
Coast,  and  bade  him my last farewell.General Grant lifted
his hat, and we responded.  I never saw  the  great  soldier
again." Upon learning of Grant's death, Mosby wrote, "I felt
that I had lost my best friend."  "Unconditional  Surrender"
Grant  and  the Gray Ghost of the Confederacy, best friends.
And there were many such relationships forged between former
warriors of the Blue and Gray.                              

So while there are Southerners who still look upon the North
with considerable disdain and who  omit  no  opportunity  to
disparage  those who fought for the Union, I prefer to focus
upon those qualities which distinguished the men  and  women
of  both  North  and  South  as  heroic  champions  of their
respective Causes.  It does no disservice to the  memory  of
our  ancestors  nor  does it diminish in the slightest their
valor and sacrifice to acknowledge their  one-time  foes  as
ladies  and  gentlemen  of honor and duty, thereby worthy of
our respect.  Quite the contrary.  That being the  case,  if
men  such as Robert E.  Lee, James Longstreet and John Mosby
could reconcile themselves to a United States of America, so
then shall I.                                               

DEO VINDICE.					Harry

Harry ADJUTANT'S REPORT
April was a significant month in history long before The War
Between The States.                                         

The received date of the most important document in Scottish
history is 6  April,  1320.   The  Declaration  of  Arbroath
reads:                                                      

We have been freed from so many great evils by the valour of
our Lord and Sovereign, Robert Bruce.  Like Judas  Maccabeus
or Joshua, he gladly endured every danger to save his people
and kingdom from their enemies.our common and  just  consent
have  made  him  our King, because through him our salvation
has been wrought.                                           

If he should give up our cause and yield us to  England,  we
would  cast  him  out  as  the  enemy  of us all, and choose
another king, who should defend us.  For so long as  only  a
hundred of us remain, we will never yield to the dominion of
England.                                                    

WE FIGHT NOT FOR GLORY  NOR  WEALTH  NOR  HONOURS,  BUT  FOR
FREEDOM  ALONE  WHICH  NO  GOOD MAN SURRENDERS BUT WITH LIFE
ITSELF.                                                     

The  last  sentence  of   the   Declaration   is   certainly
descriptive of our ancestor, the Confederate soldier.       

Taking  care  of  the  medical  needs of wounded Confederate
soldiers in Jackson Hospital, Richmond, was Surgeon Armstead
Nelson  Wellford,  an  uncle  (several times removed) of our
newest member Christopher P.  Jewett.   Welcome,  Chris,  to
the Longstreet Camp.                                        

Special  thanks  are  due  to  Gene Golden, Lewis Mills, and
Wally Scott for their back-bending work in cleaning  up  the
roadside  of Longstreet camp's one-mile section of Route 606
(Studley Road), Hanover County, near Enon  United  Methodist
Church.  Lewis is to be specially commended for handling the
logistics of this effort.  The  Hanover  Dragoons  Camp  had
scheduled  a  Confederate grave marker ceremony at the small
Confederate cemetery  Saturday,  April  3,  so  the  cleanup
occurred at an opportune time.                              

How many times have you had people ask you, "Why do you care
about something that happened 140 years  ago?"  Among  other
reasons,  we  can  learn  that  our  ancestors  endured many
hardships and, in most cases, overcame them.  Several  years
ago a young man remarked to me, "We're going to be the first
generation in America to be worse  off  than  our  parents."
Suggested  to  him was reading of War Between The States and
Reconstruction history.  This was brought to  mind  recently
by  reading  William  J.   Cooper,  Jr.'s  Jefferson  Davis,
American.  As if he didn't have enough to  contend  with  as
President  of  the  Confederate  States  of  America, his 24
post-war years were filled with  imprisonment,  uncertainty,
and numerous other difficulties.                            

Compatriots,  April  is  our  month.   Let  us celebrate our
heritage, our history, and our freedom.  It's the  least  we
can do for our valorous ancestors.                          

				Walter Tucker


THE KEY TO HAPPINESS

You may speak of love and tenderness and passion,  but  real
ecstasy is discovering you haven't lost your keys after all!


MARCH PROGRAM
James L. Hutton, III

JAMES L. HUTTON, III

James L.  "Skip" Hutton, III, a  Jungian  therapist  and  an
Episcopal  priest,  enlightened  us  at our March meeting in
discussing Southern males.                                  

Skip said that we are still in The War, and we have not been
reconciled.   We  have  been desecrated from the outside and
still feel slighted.  Respect and regret  are  part  of  our
heritage.  Something happened which will not go away.       

As a wounded people, we tend to be more religious and have a
warrior culture.                                            

Skip described Gone With the  Wind's  Ashley  Wilkes  as  an
over-refined defeatist.                                     

As in post World War I England, mothers became more dominant
because of the huge loss  of  young  men  in  the  post  War
Between The States South.                                   

Southerners  are much into the power of memory, as expressed
in William Faulkner's writing that we are "stuck in memory."

Southerners understand suffering in ways that others  don't.
Loss is accompanied by guilt.                               

Oppression began after the War.  We need to remember history
as it was, not as someone would like it to be.              

Southerners have a strong sense of honor.   Southerners  are
portrayed in the entertainment media in less than flattering
terms, often as scapegoats.  People who are scapegoating are
weak.                                                       

This    different    type   program   was   reassuring   and
thought-provoking.                                          

					Walter Dunn Tucker

GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET CAMP #1247
NEXT MEETING-TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 2004
ROMA'S RESTAURANT 8831 STAPLES MILL RD.
LOCATED ON THE RIGHT IN THE WISTAR SHOPPING CENTER
(JUST PAST THE 2ND STOPLIGHT AFTER THE AMTRAK STATION.)

DINNER- SOCIAL 6:00 PM

BE SURE TO COME AND BRING A PROSPECTIVE MEMBER OR GUEST!


horseman

LONGSTREET'S FIRST CORPS
The following is a cumulative listing of contributors to the
upkeep  of  “The  Old  War  Horse” for the period July, 2003
through the current month.                                  

Ben Baird
Lloyd Brooks
Richard Campbell
Gene Carty
Earl Carwile
Phil Cheatham
Brian Cowardin
Gary Cowardin*
Taylor Cowardin
Lee Crenshaw
Raymond Crews*
John Deacon
Jerold Evans
Shirley Ferguson†
David George
David Harris
Pat Hoggar
Jack Kane*
Michael Kidd*
Roger Kirby
Frank Marks
Lewis Mills*
Joe Moschetti*
John Moschetti*
Preston Nuttall
Ken Parsons*
Rufus Sarvay*
Wally Scott
Bill Setzer
John Shumadine
Austin Thomas
Walter Tucker*
John Vial*
Patricia Walton††
David Ware
Jerry Wells§
Harold Whitmore
Hugh Williams
Bobby Williams*

Legend
* - Multiple contributions
† - In Memoriam- Commander “Hef” Ferguson
††- In Memoriam- Commander “Chuck Walton”
§ - Visitor Donation

From July to date, 61% of our members have made  a  donation
to the upkeep and well-being of “The Old War Horse!!” Thanks
to all of you for your help.                                

2003- 2004 CAMP OFFICERS LONGSTREET CAMP #1247 Commander: Harry Boyd 741-2060 1st. Lt. Cmdr.: Taylor Cowardin 356-9625 2nd Lt. Cmdr.: Michael Kidd 270-9651 Adjutant/Treasurer: Walter Tucker 360-7247 Quartermaster: R. Preston Nuttall 276-8977 Chaplain: Henry V. Langford 340-8048


APRIL PROGRAM


Our speaker for April will be  Charles  Peple,  Director  of
Research and Development for Henrico County.                

Mr.   Peple  will make a slide presentation on using GPS and
other modern technology, along with aerial  photographs  and
Civil  War  maps, to define the extent of the battlefield of
New Market Heights.                                         

This is sure to be an interesting presentation.             

                                        Taylor Cowardin

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

THROUGH 2004 "The Confederate Nation" at the Museum  of  the
Confederacy.   The  government,  the  people  , the original
Provisional Constitution (on public exhibition for the first
time,)  artifacts,  all  great  exhibits.   A must see!  For
info, (804) 649-1861 or www.moc..org                        

APRIL 17, 18 World premiere of "Robert E.   Lee:  Shades  of
Gray,"  at  the  Carpenter Center for the Performing Arts in
Richmond.  Full length play written  and  performed  by  Tom
Dugan.  Performances Saturday 8 pm and Sunday 2 pm.  Special
hotel rates and museum discounts available.  For info: (804)
262-8100 or www.ticketmaster.com                            

APRIL  17,  18  8TH  Annual  "Civil  War Weekend" at Pamplin
Historical Park and The National Museum  of  the  Civil  War
Soldier,  Petersburg.   Tactical demonstrations of infantry,
cavalry and artillery, take part in infantry drill, hands-on
activities  for  family members.  For info: (877) PAMPLIN or
www.pamplinpark.org                                         

APRIL 24 Civil War Music and Dance  at  Endview  Plantation,
Newport  News.   Learning  how  to dance to the music of the
Civil War.  Time and place to be announced.  For info: (757)
887-1862.                                                   

APRIL  25 Col.  Ken Purks speaks on "Jed Hotchkiss and other
maps of the Brandy Station area during the  Civil  War,"  At
the Graffiti House, Brandy Station, 2-3:15 pm.  Sponsored by
the Brandy Station Foundation.   All  proceeds  benefit  the
Foundation's   efforts   to  preserve  the  battlefield  and
Graffiti House.  For info  and  registration,  Jim  Flanagan
(540) 439-3549.                                             

APRIL  30-MAY  1  Battle of the Wilderness 140th Anniversary
Civil War Weekend.  Battlefield and  house  tours,  seminar,
dinners,  auctions,  authors,  unveiling  of a new art work.
Attendees include James  Lighthizer,  David  Jordan,  Gordon
Rhea,  John Paul Strain.  Sponsored by Friends of Wilderness
Battlefield.  For info: (540) 972-4782.                     


MAY 1,2 "Where Pelham Fell: The Cavalry  Battle  at  Kelly"s
Ford and Chancellorsville," at Kelly's Ford, Culpeper.  141st
Chancellorsville reenactment Saturday;  5th  annual  Kelly's
Ford  battle  reenactment  Sunday.  Horse races, concerts by
97th Regimental String Band.  Public  hours:  Saturday  9-9,
Sunday  9-3.   $5 over age 6.  Hosted by Inn at Kelly's Ford
and Brandy Station Foundation.  For info:(540)  399-1779  or
kellysfordinn@aol.com                                       

MAY  6-9  "Footsteps  of  Jackson,  Part  2-Stonewall in the
Valley," seminar and tour based  in  Lexington.   Historians
Ted  Alexander  and  Dennis  Frye  plus  Robert  Tanner, Ron
Maxwell, Keith and Patricia  Gibson,  Holt  Merchant,  Frank
O'Reilly,  John  Schildt,  Mike Cavanaugh.  Lectures, panel,
walking tours to Lexington landmarks, full day tour of  1862
Valley   Campaign   sites.   For  info:  (717)  264-7101  or
chaden@chambersburg.org                                     

MAY 7-9 140TH Reenactment of  the  Battle  of  Spotsylvania.
Battles, educational programs, talks by historians.  Quarter
mile of authentic earthworks.  Adults $20 one day, $35 both,
ages  6-12  $10,  $18.   Education  day  $10.   Sponsored by
Spotsylvania  County.    For   info:   (540)   891-8687   or
www.fredericksburgvirginia.net                              

MAY  10-13  An  Ed  Bearss  First:  "The James Taylor Sketch
Book," Bearss, John Heatwole  and  Dana  McBean  3-day  tour
covering   Sheridan's   1864  Valley  Campaign  and  Mosby's
Confederacy, visiting sites sketched by  Taylor.   Sponsored
by  the  Blue  and  Gray Education Society.  Fee.  For info:
(888) 741-2437 or www.blue-and-grayeducation.org            

2004 HERITAGE PARADE IN RICHMOND
Sunday, April 4th was bright and breezy, a good  day  for  a
parade.  One that kept our Confederate flags proudly waving.

In  spite  of  the Governor's refusal to declare Confederate
History and Heritage Month, the Virginia SCV declared it  so
on  its own and proceeded to start it off with a parade from
the Boulevard to Hollywood Cemetery.                        

Parade Photo 1

Longstreet Camp was ably represented by its  members,  among
whom  were  Cmdr.   Harry  Boyd, Dave Thomas and son, Austin
Waters  Wingfield   Thomas,   our   perky   and   precocious
Confederate.   Austin did his share and more, as you can see
from the photo above, to add to the grand occasion!         


Parade Photo 2

The parade started  at  the  Boulevard,  proceeding  to  the
Jackson monument, then turned East on Monument.             


Parade Photo 3

Cmdr. Boyd and Dave Thomas carry our flags proudly.


Parade Photo 4

In full swing down Monument Avenue


Parade Photo 5

Marse Robert was surely pleased to see The Battle Flag once more!


Parade Photo 6

Some of the troops take a break at Hollywood.

ANCESTOR'S UNIT OF THE MONTH
THE RICHMOND AMBULANCE COMPANY

The Richmond Ambulance Company was organized in  early  1862
by  a  group  of  50 Richmond men as the "Richmond Ambulance
Committee." The company's primary purpose was  to  meet  the
needs  of the Confederate wounded.  Most of the men involved
were exempt from military duty.  Unlike  the  Federals,  the
Confederates did not have a well funded and organized method
of retrieving its wounded  from  the  battlefield.   Wounded
soldiers  had  great  difficulty getting to where they could
receive the necessary  care  and  treatment.   Many  wounded
Confederates  laid  out  in  the battlefield for days before
they were removed to the hospital or given any  care.   Many
perished  before they were retrieved.  The Ambulance Company
not only rescued the fallen from the battlefield in a timely
manner,  but  helped to provide them with the necessary care
and attention they  so  desperately  needed.   The  Richmond
Ambulance  Committee's  first  service  was at the Battle of
Seven Pines.  The June 12, 1862 Richmond Daily Examiner gave
the following account:                                      

During  and  after  the  battles of Saturday and Sunday, the
value of the committee was first  manifested.   Under  their
direction,  and  with  their assistance alone, two-thirds of
our wounded  were  removed  from  the  field.Throughout  the
terribly  dark  night,  the  first  squads of the committee,
lantern in hand, traversed the woods and  swamps  for  miles
around  Seven  Pines, hunting up the fallen and bearing them
to the roadside hospitals, where even the candles  by  which
the  surgeons  plied  their profession were furnished by the
forethought of the committee.                               

The   Company   also   served   during   the   battles    of
Mechanicsville,  Cold  Harbor, Malvern Hill, Frayser's Farm,
and most of the other battles the Army of Northern  Virginia
fought  until  its  surrender in April of 1865.  The company
served  without  any  pay   and   furnished   supplies   and
necessities  for  the  wounded  with their own funds.  These
selfless men truly deserve our  respect  and  admiration  as
they  saved  many  lives  and  contributed  greatly  to  the
Confederate cause.                                          
                                         Taylor Cowardin

THE ANGEL OF MARYE'S HEIGHTS

THE ANGEL OF MARYE'S HEIGHTS

ANOTHER NEW COMPATRIOT!
THE ANGEL OF MARYE'S HEIGHTS

1st. Lt. Cmdr. Taylor Cowardin administers
The oath to Henry Franklin Bahen

Please , if you have not already done so, make it a point to
introduce  yourself  to  Compatriot Bahen at the May meeting
and welcome him into our  "band  of  brothers."             

RAFFLE WINNER #1
Raffle Winner

WAITE RAWLS

By one of those strange quirks of statistics and chance, one
of  our  newest Compatriots, Waite Rawls, Executive Director
of the Museum of the Confederacy, copped the cash prize  for
April.   He  informed us, to our appreciative applause, that
he was going to donate it to the MOC!                       

He also spoke  to  us  briefly  about  the  Museum  and  its
treasure  trove  of  incunabula  and  artifacts  within  its
vaults, stating that he was honored to be chosen to head  up
such a prestigious institution.                             


RAFFLE WINNER #2

Due to the confusion (and to the fact that we had  40,  yes,
FORTY!!), members and guests at the meeting, your editor did
not get a photo of the second winner, JEB Stuart VI, who was
promised  a  book  by  Walter Tucker.  Congratulations, JEB!
Your luck is holding up very well!!  If we're not  mistaken,
that's two meetings in a row!!                              

LITTLE KNOWN FACTS
To render abandoned cannon useless to the enemy,  retreating
artillerymen "spiked" their guns by driving iron spikes into
the barrel vent (where the primer went)  And,  if  they  had
time , breaking the spike off and hammering it down.        

CENTENNIAL COMMEMORATION OF THE DEATH
OF
LT. GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET

On May  2,  2004,  Blue  Ridge  Rifles  Camp  1860,  SCV  of
Dahlonega,  Georgia  will  host  a recreation of the funeral
procession and graveside  services  of  Lt.   General  James
Longstreet to mark the 100th Anniversary of his death.      

The  program  will  begin  at  1:30  PM  at  the Hall County
Courthouse Mall, near the Gainesville town  square,  with  a
recreation  of  the funeral.  This will be followed with the
procession down Jesse Jewel Parkway to Alta  Vista  Cemetery
complete  with  horse  drawn  hearse,  honor guard, band and
others, just as it took place on January 6, 1904.           

Re-enactors are invited to attend  and  participate  in  the
procession  and the honor guard firing of the 100 gun salute
at the grave site at 3:30 PM.                               

There  will  be  Commemorative   Programs   and   Medallions
available  for  $5  each.   Ancestor  Memorial  Listings and
advertising  spaces  are  available  in  the   Commemorative
Program.                                                    

The  event  will  be  video taped and the tapes will be made
available shortly after the event.                          

Those    interested    should     watch     the     website,
www.longstreetfuneral.org for further details.              

"SHADES OF GRAY"
TOM DUGAN

TOM DUGAN

Another Confederate World Premiere comes to the fair city of
Richmond on April 17th and 18th!                            

This  time it is a two-act play written and performed by Tom
Dugan, a film and television actor of 20 years experience.  

The play is a one  man  reenactment,  actually,  of  General
Robert  E.   Lee  as he sat in the parlor of Wilmer McLean's
house at Appomattox, alone, on April 9,  1865,  waiting  for
General Ulysses S.  Grant to arrive and accept the surrender
of the Army of Northern Virginia.                           

Dugan gives us insight into Lee's thoughts at what, for Lee,
must have been the most heart-rending time of his life.     

Graphics and period music add to the setting of the play.   

There are two performances scheduled at the Carpenter Center
for the Performing Arts, Saturday, April 17th at 8:00 PM and
Sunday, April 18th at 2:00 PM.                              

Longstreet  Camp  was asked to coordinate this effort on the
behalf of the Virginia Division of the SCV  and  members  of
your  Camp  Executive  Committee will be on hand meeting and
greeting guests at both performances.                       

There will also be period  displays  in  the  lobby  of  the
Carpenter Center.                                           

Tickets  may  be  purchased  at the box office or by calling
(804) 262-8100.  Hotel and museum  discounts  are  available
for out of town members.                                    

45TH ANNUAL CONVENTION VIRGINIA DIVISION, SCV
April 23, 24 &25
The Best Western, South Hill, VA
Registration- Friday, April 23, 4-9 pm
$25 per attendee
Friday night Commander's Reception- $12 per person
Saturday Night's Social Hour & Grand banquet- 
$20 per person

Room Rate- $51.95 per night + tax.
(434) 447-3123 or (800) 296-3123 for reservations
Located at intersection of I85 & US 58 
(off I85 at Exit 12)
For more convention info: Jimmie Cox, 
(434) 636-3900 or jncdoc@buggs.net
Tracy Clary, (434) 848-4556 or brunswickreb@aol.com

Sponsored by 
The Armistead-Hill-Goode-Elam Camp 1624
&
The Old Brunswick Camp 512


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©2004 James Longstreet Camp, #1247, SCV - Richmond, Virginia